Religion is man-made

By reading the Qur’an with care it becomes obvious that God did not intend that there be any ‘religion’ at all. The Reading promotes a way of life which is acceptable with God and which promotes the wellbeing of people. There is no need to define it as a religion. It is clearly stated in the Reading that no prophets or messengers brought ‘religion’ from God. God revealed a deen to them so that the people around them would serve the unseen God by observing righteous deeds amongst themselves for their own benefit in this world and the Hereafter. And, thus informed, people would also know and avoid the unholy and the hypocritical behaviour of ‘religion’ by the deeds of those who profess and practice it. The surah of the Reading attributed to Noah states that he worked day and night calling the people to abandon religion. Noah told them they should not serve anyone or anything except God. They should observe a way of life for God. His neighbours and friends did not heed his call.

Noah said, “O my people, I come to you as a Warner. You shall serve God and work righteousness and obey me.” (71:2-3)

The response from his community was:

They said. “Do not abandon your idols, do not abandon Wadd, or Suwa, or Yaghoot, or Ya’ooq and Nasar.” (71:23)

The idols Wadd, Suwa, Yaghoot, Ya’ooq, and Nasar are names after the religious sages who were the gods of those who follow their teachings. Similarly, names like Bukhari, Shafie, Wahab, Gulam Ahmad, or Aga Khan are gods of their respective cults, Ezzra for Judaism, and Paul in Christianity.

The people of Noah were probably rich, prosperous and comfortable with their way of life. They did not suffer any poverty in their ‘religion’ of worshipping idols. Noah did not fit into the popular pattern of the day. The Reading teaches us that following the masses ends badly:

If you follow the majority of the people on earth they will divert you from the path of God. They follow only conjecture and they only guess. (6:116)

Muhammad espoused the same message as Noah. He was simply the messenger of God, he was not a worshipper. He worked to spread the word of God and hope it prevails over other deens. One would logically assume that Muslims the world over would want to emulate the Last Prophet and embody the teaching he brought. It is illuminating in that regard to read what the message he received was:

We have decreed for you the same deen as was enjoined upon Noah and what is revealed to you herein, and also what was enjoined upon Abraham, Moses and Jesus. You shall uphold the one deen and not be divided. It is simply too difficult for the idol-worshippers to accept what you advocate. God is the one who will bring towards Him whomever He wills, and He will guide towards Himself those who would return. (42:13)

Read that again: ‘It is simply too difficult for the idol-worshippers to accept what you advocate’.

That statement is self-explanatory: people who profess religion are regarded as idol-worshippers, they will simply not be able to fathom God’s true deen (as advocated in the Reading alone and discussed in this work).

In addition, their almost certain adverse reaction to this book will bear testament to veracity of this statement.

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9 Responses

  1. Salam,

    I confess that what I have read thus are hard for me to digest. But I like take the journey further and learn “something new”.

    Since I am not an Arabic literate can you suggest to me the best translation of the qur’an for me to refer to or is Yusuf Ali, good enough?

    Wassalam

  2. Exactly. A means of social control by the rulers over the people. Muhammad is nothing more than a charlatan, a power hungry empire builder. He borrowed for the ancient religions of Judaism and Christianity, tweaked them for his Arab audience and used these to rule over them.
    The Qur’an is nothing more than a political manifesto, falsely attributed as revelations from God, to give it legitimacy.

  3. Reblogged this on Shinubi Wang and commented:
    Should we nominate this author for the Nobel Prize? Maybe. However, the greatest feat will be to educate more than 1.5 billions to leave Islam. We may even include the other religions. They are all man-made and turn many people into idiots; even worse, beget violence as seen by the propensity of Muslims to resort to violence if you dared to ‘insult’ their religion or prophet, Muhammad.

  4. Adam

    This is all great to read. but how do non arabic people like us know what you are saying is right? We have no understanding of the arabic use of language whether modern or traditional. The arabic lexicons are another headache to devour. my suggestion is for aidid safar to provide a more comprehensive study on the use of these words that may or may not change how people view the quran and islam. I have even emailed Aidid asking about slavery in the quran.I dont agree with the fact that it allows slavery even if there are verses stating that muslims should free slaves. its been almost 3 weeks and i have not received a reply.

  5. To know arabic language or vice versa is never being the criteria of being on the right path or not or being better guided or not .It is God that provides guidance as to whom is deserving to His judgement regardless of knowing or not knowing arabic .Aidid had explained his book quite well and with just a bit of common sense i was able to grasp and evaluate the subject of discussion in the book call ‘Mental Bondage ‘ and the Arab conspiracy against Islam .I have always being searching for the truth for a long time and it should really be an endless journey to this and finally what really matters is coming back to Him with a sound heart and not the abundance of knowledge .Knowledge without wisdom would create a very dangerous person .Even the Arabs who know the Quran language does not make them more islamic or to mean being peaceful or a peaceful person with regard to the meaning of being in Islam or a Muslim .Thus language should never be a barrier to follow the path of God , but what is needed is sincerity and effort and God would surely provide guidance to such a person .The chaos and killings in the Middle East should be a good testimony to what has been said .And God said that what is good or bad is very clear as clear as between the daylight and darkness .

  6. I dont think you fully understood my question. i know being arabic or understanding arabic is not a criteria for being guided. my question was simply how do we know what to verify from all of this if one does not understand arabic? if the early clergymen are able to manipulate the language and put meaning to words, how do we know its not the same here or with any other translation?

  7. My following comments may be off-tangent to the current topic of discussion. But what I would like to add is, Aidid’s advise a long time ago, was for the readers themselves to go through the Quran. It may be the translated copy but with what you have already gathered from Aidid’s book, it should help you spot the verses of interest.

    When Aidid first suggested this (to read the translated Quran yourself), I thought that he had shortchanged me. I mean, why cant he tell the whole thing.

    But after doing it, I now realize that, that was the best advise and approach. I wouldn’t dare to be so arrogant as to say that ‘I see the light’ but I see a lot more today than a year ago.

    Aidid – you may not admit that you have helped provide the path ( as the Quran has clearly mentioned that all such things are with God’s grace), but it sure helped. Thank you.

    Similarly, I would like to say the same thing for the others. Read the translated Quran (in whatever language you are comfortable with). Just cruise through those sentences that may not appear important and stop and analyze those that is of interest. Use what Aidid had written as reference (or any other source that you are quite confident with) and make your judgment.
    At the end of the day, ask yourself, are what the Muslim’s of the world been practicing as what the Quran asks us to?
    I hope God gives you his blessing and allow you to see more clearly then.

  8. As a basic initial guide. Every word used in the Quran must have the same meaning in every verse. If you find the same word having different meanings in different verses then this is a manipulation and must be questioned. Secondly, a word that is derivative of another word must have a semantic link. For instance ketab, maktaba, yektub are all semantically linked with books, writing etc.
    Peace and blessings.

  9. There is magick in this world. The magick of the Muslims is the religion they practice today. The magick of the Jews, Christians and Buddhist among others is also out there.These rituals have power- with deep conviction change often appears in the physical world. In every human gathering there are ‘entities’ present. When all the people present are offering ritual based prayers to these entities; whether knowingly or unknowingly, surely there will be change- negative or positive.

    So if a group stop these rituals all together, they will be rendered defenceless against other groups that engage in rituals. God has set a set of rules or decrees as this article hints to, which is absolutely true. The rules of the Universe (which God fashioned) is simply good versus evil. If one is inclined towards evil surely he will be doomed in hell and if one is more inclined towards good he will be blessed with success in the hereafter.

    The universe is energy and human beings can impact the desired change they want through their thoughts. God warns against idolatry but ‘if’ one offers ritual prayers to God and not to any other deity (whether such a prayer [nemaz] exists in the Quran or not), will that not make him more positive and ultimately more inclined toward good?

    Therefore one cannot condemn ritual prayers, one can only (as this article rightfully reveals) know that the prayers are not prescribed by God and are often idolatry. However, if one can offer ritual prayers without idolatry, will that not be beneficial?

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