The corruptions

Here is a summary of the corruptions which have been practised against the sense of the Reading by Arab religionists to suit their own purposes:

  1. A’kiffin wa-roka’is-sujud in 2:125 and 22:26 was made to mean bowing and prostrating physically when, in fact, it signifies humble oneself consentingly to God’s sanctioned system.
  2. Sol-laa-ta wa-atu-zakaa is not ritual prayer and wealth tax. It means we are to uphold our commitments and keep them pure.
  3. Sol-laa does not refer to ritual prayers. Its meaning was corrupted to become rituals. The Reading encourages personal commitment through deeds.
  4. Thor-iffin is not walking around or Tawwaf around the stone idol in Mecca but the meaning is groups or throngs of people.
  5. A’kif-fun is not a retreat to a house or to a mosque, but to hold strongly to God’s system or bayta. Wa-antum a’kiffun fi-masaajid’ in 2:187 means and when you are devoted in the consented decrees.
  6. Bayta is not a physical house belonging to God..
  7. Masaajid are not buildings but the consented decrees.
  8. Masa-jidil-lah are not God’s mosques but the consented decrees prescribed by God in the Quran.
  9. Masjidil-Harami is not ‘sacred mosque’. It is the sanctions of the God’s consented decree prescribed in the Quran.
  10. Bayti-ya is not My house, but it is My system. Noah used this word to refer to his system of belief. God uses the term bayti-ka on everyone of us to signify that He removes us from our system to His system after manifesting the truth to us.
  11. Hurumun is not the pilgrim’s garb. The word in 5:1 was twisted to perpetuate the invented Haj pilgrimage of the Arab religion. The word Hurumun simply means restricted or forbidden.
  12. U’mrah is not a visit to the Arab land, but is to promote the deen according to God’s consented decrees or the mas-jidil-lah as prescribed in the Quran.
  13. Haj is not a yearly pilgrimage to Mecca. It is to take the challenge: (1) to the system (2) to deliver the message until it is accepted in society (3) to promote the sanctions of God’s decree and (4) in the path of God (see: 3:97, 2:196, 9:19 and 4:100).
  14. The accepted sense of many words from the Reading has been severely mutilated to suit the rituals of the man-made Arab religion. The worst distortion of God’s word is in 2:196. The perception of the meaning of almost all the words in that verse has been distorted. The verse gives a guideline of how and what a person should do when he or she takes the challenge to promote God’s guidance until it is made acceptable by the masses – but it was distorted to reflect as pilgrimage to suit only for men.

For the Muslims who believe the Reading is the word of God, their duty is to:

  1. Find the path to the System (bayta) and take up the challenge (Haj) to promote what has been sanctioned by God in the Reading to establish the peacefulness or the true Islam.
  2. Uphold commitments (Sol-laa), keep them pure (zakaa) according to God’s laws (sha’iral-lah) and to promote (ya’muru) His consented decrees prescribed in the Quran.
  3. Take the challenge (Haj) and promote (or i’mara-ta) the sanctions of the consented decree (masjidil-Harami) and strive (jahidu) against the idol-worshippers (mushrikeen) and the rejecters (wal-kafireen) who bow and prostrate to stones, rocks and wood (and in this case falsely attribute their practice to Islam).
  4. Not violate decrees or upset the harmony in the sanctioned system (baytal-Harami).
  5. Live according to the sanctions in the system and uphold their obligations.

As we look around us, religious system has been the most powerful tool in enslaving people’s mind; it instils fear, cultivates disorder, separating people, bound in hatred, myth and superstition – a condition which is in the temporal interests of a small ruling elite. Today, our civilisation is living in a deteriorating world and people have tried to solve the world’s ill in many ways at all levels – sadly they failed to look at the problems where it exists – in organised religion.

Hajaa Ibrohim

In 2:258 is the story of a man who challenged Abraham. The phrase used is Hajaa ibrohim. It should be clear that this does not mean that he sent Abraham on a pilgrimage to Mecca.

Many Muslims who have completed their pilgrimage to the stone idol in Mecca append the word Haji to their name (e.g. Haji Sulaiman or Haji Raheemudin) – a habit which Arabs find highly amusing.

Alam-tara-ilal-lazi Hajaa Ibrohim fi-rob-bi-hi (2:258)

Have you not considered the man who challenged Abraham about his Lord with it? (2:258)

Hajaa ibrohim has the same fundamental root as Haji i’mara-ta mas-jidil-Harami in 9:19 which refers to the people who take the challenge to promote the sanctions in the consented decree.

This study highlights how the semantic distortions against the Reading by the religionists have had a very damaging effect, and how – as soon as they twist one word – a chain reaction occurs because they then have to change the meanings of other words from the same root word to support the deception. Haj – as we have seen – has not been left unscathed in this regard.

The Arabic in the Reading is easy and perfect. Let us briefly remind ourselves how the Qur’anic Arabic renders nouns denoting people relating to the root-word concepts.

  • The meaning of Sol-laa is commitment or obligation. A man who (singular) is committed is called a muSollan (2:125). If plural they are called muSollin (107:5).
  • The meaning of Islam is peacefulness. A man who is at peace is said to be a Muslim (2:131). If plural, muslimin for men and Muslimat for women.
  • The meaning of ihtada is to be truly guided. Many guided people are called muh-tadin (2:16)
  • The meaning of azan is to announce. A man who makes the announcement is called a muazzinun (7:44).

Similarly the meaning of the word Haj is challenge. People who take the challenge are called Hajii (9:19). People who are involved in the challenge are called the muHajiirin (9:100).

The challenge is Haj. In 3:97 God says take the challenge (Hajuu) to His System if we can find our way to it. In 2:196 Take the challenge (Ha-jaa) to promote (u’mro-ta) the guidance (hadya) to the people until it is made acceptable (mahilla). They are the rightful people to promote (ya’muru) God’s consented decree (mas-jidil-lah) (9:18) who take the challenge (Hajii) (9:19) by promoting (i’marata) the sanctions in the consented decree.

It is the duty upon mankind towards God to take the challenge (Hajuu) to the system (bayta) for those who can find their way. (3:97)

For those who are convinced about God and want to observe His prescribed way of life, they must take the challenge Hajuu to His system ‘if they can find the way’. This is the challenge or Haj only for those who are willing to accept the responsibility to strive in the path of God with their money and lives in promoting the sanctions in the consented decree. They have only one common enemy – organised religions. Consciously or not – religion is the greatest enemy to humanity and its doctrine can wipe out the mountains. Religious promoters corrupt the earth by enslaving peoples’ mind, body and soul and teach them separation and intolerance in the name of God. Religious leaders and the shackled followers are term as idol-worshippers. In the Reading, there is no instruction for us to wage war against anyone except the idol-worshippers. Thus the biggest challenge (Hajii Akhbar 9:3) for mankind is to disown the idol-worshippers with stern reminder that they can never escape from God for lying in the name of God.

People who are not involved with the challenge may live in this world peacefully as normal human beings. They can be architects, scientists, doctors, firemen, engineers, soldiers, students, taxi or truck drivers, traders, teachers, or other professions that can benefit society and whole of mankind – whilst observing their commitments in doing the good deeds and good works without associating God with anything. That is all what is required of us on this earth.

The religionists say Haj is a pilgrimage culminating in reverence around the area where they built a square house in Mecca. This is the extent of their distortion.

We are not to put on the Roman togas, shave our head, throw stones at some brick pillars, kiss a black granite stone, walk in semi-circles around another stone structure crying, “I have come God, I have come” and then walk away feeling satisfied that we have fulfilled our commitments. Rather, we are actively and consciously to take the challenge or the Haj to move ourselves closer to living a way of life (deen) that is sanctioned by God. That is Haj is about.

3:97 states: ‘manis-tha-tha’a ilaihi sabiilaan’ which means ‘whoever can find his way there’. If pilgrimage were indeed a religious ritual to the Ka’aba in today’s Mecca in Saudi Arabia, or even the Mecca of 500 years ago, there would be no mystery in finding our way there. Even 500 years ago, people knew where Mecca was. One simply had to get on a camel or horse (or a jumbo jet today) in order to reach it. Where is the difficulty in finding it?

But we cannot get to God’s system by jumping on a jumbo jet or riding on a camel. We must take the challenge to get there. It is a test of our commitment. We definitely cannot get there by shaving our head, wearing a toga, throwing some stones at a stone pillar like a child, kissing a piece of black granite or walking in circles around another stone pillar. If we insist on doing these things, we become religious morons doing something without using our common sense and without having any knowledge of the Reading. It is not difficult for humans to take the challenge Hajuu to God’s system and be devoted to His System or humbly consenting to His system. His system is not a religion. Period.

Islam or ‘peacefulness’ is the universal way of life that can be observed by any human on earth. It requires no institution or organization. In many cases there are wise men like Luqman who did not received any consented decree from God, but he was endowed with wisdom.

Each and every person is responsible for whatever he does during his lifetime. Each will be judged as an individual. We have the freedom to believe or disbelieve.

Haj means an intellectual challenge or a response to a challenge and it does not mean pilgrimage in any shape or form. Similarly, hijr does not mean what the religionists say. It is not primarily about emigration. Its core meanings are related to leaving (i.e. shunning or leaving off) and in this sense it is connected to the essence with that of the purpose of Haj.

Indeed those who believe and take the challenge (ha-jaa-ru) to struggle with the money and lives in the path of God as well as those who shelter and lend support they are protector of each other. But those who believe but have not taken the challenge (yu-ha-jee-ru) you owe them no obligation to lend support to them from anything until they take the challenge (yu-ha-jee-ru). But if they seek your assistance in the way of life (deen) it is therefore your duty to support them unless there is among you made an agreement with them. God sees whatever you do. (8:72)

Here the word ha-jaa-ru and yu-ha-jee-ru refers to two types of believers. Both are staying in the same area. Both words were erroneously translated as emigrating by the religionists. A person who strives in the path of God is not required to emigrate from his hometown. The evidence can be found in 3:195.

Their Lord responds to these by saying, “I never neglect to reward any worker among you, male or female; you are equal to each other. Those among you who take the challenge (ha-jaa-ru) and get banished from your homes, I will certainly redeem all their wrongdoings and admit them into gardens with flowing streams”. Such is the reward from God. God possesses the best reward. (3:195)

If ha-jaa-ru means emigrating, then there is no way they can be banished from their home. Clearly this word refers to the activities of striving in the cause of God by taking the challenge which is the ha-jaa-ru or to take the challenge in the path of God ha-jee-ru-fi-sa-bi-lil-lah.

Abraham, for example, settled in a new place – implying that those who wished to follow him would have to establish their commitment to the sanctioned system. He did not emigrate to another town or country to strive in the path of God.

Moses remained in Egypt until he moved away because of oppression. Moses and his people were banished for striving in the path of God.

Shuaib remained in Midyan and Jacob remained in the desert until his son summoned him to the city. They never moved to a new town to promote God’s deen.

Jonah tried to flee from his people but was severely dealt with.

In spite of rejection, Jesus did not move to another place. On the other hand, we have a key example (see 2:61) of the Children of Israel who – having physically forsaken Egypt – remained essentially steeped in the things which Egypt had to offer. Was theirs a state of migrating at this point? It would seem not.

The word ‘committed’ corrupted

In 2:125, the word muSolla is derived from the root Sol-laa with a prefix of mu represents Abraham as the doer in the singular.

The enemies of the Last Prophet, however, say the word ‘ibrohimi muSolla’ is a place of ritual prayer where Abraham stood to pray (and then somehow his footprints were miraculously appeared in a copper block at the same spot). We should note that there are three numbers in Arabic: singular, dual and plural. When the doer of Sol-laa is in the singular he is called muSollan, but when the doer is plural they are called muSollin. The word muSollin is also found in the Reading:

  • In 2:125 ibrohimi-muSol-laa informs us that a man by the name of Abraham was the doer of the Sol-laa. Abraham was called a muSollan.
  • In 107:5 (see below) the same word is used to indicate many people (plural) who are the doers of their Sol-laa. They are called the muSollin. This is the plural of muSollan.

The same method was used by the religionists in their shuffle of the word Sol-laa. They say one thing in one place and then something else in another place. The word muSollan (in the singular) appears only once in the Reading and it refers to this particular person who was made the ‘leader’ for mankind.

It seems – in their haste to ascribe meanings to words in order to shore up their religion – the religionists overlooked the fact that the same word is used in the plural at three other places in the Reading. We will look at all instances now:

Min-maqam-mi Ibrahima muSollan (singular) (2:125)

The status of Abraham, the committed.

Illaa muSollin (plural) (70:22)

Except those who are committed.

Lam-naku Minal muSollin (plural) (74:43)

We are not from among those who are committed.

Wai-lul Lil- muSollin (plural) al-lazi-nahum ala-Sol-laa-tihim saa-hun (107:5-6)

Woe for those who are committed but they are careless of their commitments.

The last verse refers to those who take their commitments in jest: woe to them!

No Arabic linguist would dare say muSollan is a place of ritual prayers; but the religionists insist the word refers a physical location. So in 2:125 they prolong the corruption by claiming that ibrohima muSollan is Abraham’s place of ritual prayer. There is a logical and grammatical contradiction here for which no priest or u’lema can provide any explanation.

MuSollan is nothing but the singular of an active participle who upholds the Sol-laa. MuSollin is the plural. This is simple Arabic.

An example: in 7:44 there is a proclaimer of an announcement. The word announce in Arabic is azan and the past tense is azzana. The person who proclaims or makes the announcement is called the Mu-Azzin.

Then it is announced (azzana) by the announcer (MuAzzin), “God’s curse has befallen the wicked.” (7:44)

Similarly, Abraham was the upholder of the commitment or Sol-laa and he is called a muSollan – committed man. Even the scholars who know the Arabic language were taken for a ride by the religionists. Are they not part of the conspiracy, then?

The worship of a stone house

The following chapters focus on the analysis of many Arabic words. These words will be written according to their vocalic sounds. Readers not familiar with Arabic are asked to bear with me. It is important to refer to these words because most of the time the enemies of God and His messengers will distort words, which seem to be similar and yet are not.

He is the one who revealed to you this Scripture with perfect verses as the essence of the book, and the rest are consistent. Those who are sick in the hearts are inclined to follow that which is not consistent with the intention to disparage and to interpret them. No one knows their interpretations except God. And those who are well founded in knowledge say, “We believe in all the revelations from our Lord.” No one will take heed except those who are intelligent. (3:7)

The essence of the Scripture is that the verses are perfect. Perfect means without defect. If we perceive any contradiction it is not the fault of the Book, but we have to sincerely admit that it is perhaps our lack of understanding or that our comprehension of the message is less than good.

Why do they not study the Reading carefully? If it were from other than God, they would have found many contradictions therein. (4:82)

In other words when God says, ‘You must not serve other than Me‘ it simply means that anyone who claims to have found a way to serve Him which contradicts His message must be in error. Arab or not. Likewise, if God says, ‘You must not associate anything with Me’ it means we cannot do something to the contrary and provide excuses to justify our action. That cannot be too difficult to understand. It is a simple black-and-white statement. No one would dream of answering the question, “Are you pregnant?” with an evasive: “Just a little bit.” Either you are or you are not.

In chapter three we saw how the religionists shuffle the word Sol-laa by giving it different meanings. They only end up contradicting themselves when they try to manipulate the same word elsewhere in the Reading. That is exactly why the verse says the contradictions are not from God but from other than Him.

Chapter 2:125 has been the singular misfortune of being the Arab religionists’ main target to twist God’s words to justify their Arab religion. I will prove by reference to the Reading that eight simple words in 2:125 have been corrupted by the enemies of God.

The word bayta is found twice. If we examine the word critically and compare it with other verses in the Reading we will discover why the religionists’ claim that this means a physical house – and the so-called Ka’aba in Mecca in particular – has no basis.

There are many words, which require examination in this one verse alone. Each has to be explained clearly. This chapter will discuss only bayta and bayti-ya. Other words in the same verse will be discussed in the next chapter.


Related posts:

Questions that the religionists cannot answer

The proponents of the ritual prayer can only pick five verses from the Reading on the basis of which – by quoting them out of context – they claim an imperative for the ritual prayer. However, they cannot quote any verse from the Reading to show the methods of the rituals, as they themselves concede.

Perhaps now it is time for them to answer some questions:

  • How do you pardon the idol-worshippers when they continue to remain as idol-worshippers even though they have performed the ritual prayer? (9:4-6)

  • How are idol-worshippers to perform the ritual prayer?

  • How did the Prophet lead the ritual prayers for the non-believers according to (your reading of) 4:101-102?

In-naal kafirin nakanu lakum ‘aduwun mubin, wa-izza konta fi-hem fa-aqom-ta lahum Sol-laa-ta (4:101-102)

Surely the disbelievers are your manifest enemy, And when you are in their midst you shall lead them in Sol-laa (ritual prayer?) (4:101-102)

  • How can the ritual prayer of the Prophet console people or make them happy? (9:103)

  • When you are in sudden disaster or facing sudden death, how can the two strangers who are to be witnesses (and who may not know anything about the Arab religion) perform the ritual prayer before swearing to God that they will be truthful? (5:106)

  • How did all the people of a town and those living in the surrounding areas preserve their ritual prayer (wa hum alaa Sol-laa-tihim haafizuun) as soon as they heard the message of the Reading (6:92)? It may have included non-believers, Christians or Jews.

  • Why is it that yuSollu means ritual prayer in 4:102 but in 33:56 it means honour and support?

  • Likewise, how does the word yuSollee in 3:39 turn into ritual prayer while in 33:43 it is said to mean honour?

  • Solluu in 33:56 and Sollee in 9:103 have come to mean honour and supplication. In 75: 31 and in 96:10 the word Sol-laa is said to mean ritual prayer. Why is that?

  • How do the birds in the sky and everything between the heavens and the earth (including frogs, termites and trees, for example) perform their ritual prayer? (24:41)

  • How could the ritual prayer (Sol-laa-tuka) of Shuaib in 11:87 have changed the economic system of the people?

  • Why are the same Sol-laa-waatee in 2:238 (‘guard your ‘Sol-laa-waatee’) and 9: 99 (the Messenger’s Sol-laa-waatee) understood differently?

  • Why are the same words Sol-laa-waa-tun in 2:157 (ulaa ika alaihim Sol-laa-waatun) and 22:40 (wa Sol-laa-waatun, wa masaa-jidu) stated with different meanings?

  • Is there anyone performing the ‘ritual prayer‘ by controversial talk and rebellion (Sol-laa-tuhum ‘indal baiti mukaan wa tashdiyyan) anywhere in the world? If so, where and how? (8:35)

  • How did the word muSollan (singular) evolve to mean location or place for performing ritual prayer in 2:125 when the same word muSollin (plural) is understood as the people who perform the ritual prayer in 107:4?

It is inappropriate for the word Sol-laa or any of the derivatives (generated from the same root word) to be rendered as a ritual act by people toward God. Its meanings relate to the commitments which link a human being to God through their deliberate deeds.

Sol-laa is the commitment to observe the prescribed covenants. This encompasses the whole of God’s commandments in the Reading to people. It covers obligations, relationships, agreements between people, a person’s obligations to own self, and matters of cleanliness and diet. It extends to promises, dealings, relationships, families, and parenting. There is nothing ‘religious’ about it.

Frequently asked questions

Proponents of ritual prayer are fond of saying that certain verses where this root verb appears prove the existence of ritual prayer. Their arguments tend to be like the following:

  1. What about 5:6 where you are supposed to do the ritual ablution (which they call wudu) before Sol-laa?

    Surely, that proves that ritual prayer is needed. Surah 5 is to be read from 1 through to 7. Verse 6 is about being hygienic. The first two verses talk about food. People should observe the harmony sanctioned by God in the system. Verse 3 has more details on food, and then it says, ‘Today the way of life (or the deen) is perfected’ after detailing unhygienic food. The fourth and the fifth verses also talk about food with additional decrees that Muslims can marry the people of the previous Scripture. That in itself should be an eye-opener.The subsequent verse says that we are upholding our commitments when we make ourselves clean. In verse 7 we are told to be appreciative of God’s blessing upon us and we should uphold the covenants He made with us from the time we say, ‘We hear and we obey’.Hygiene is part of our commitments. And if there is no water to wash ourselves, God has prescribed an alternative i.e. to use clean dry soil to clean our hands. The point is, we are obliged to be as clean as we can – and here the limits are described with provision for extreme circumstances.

    There is no such thing as the word ritual cleansing or wudu (this common term used by the majority of the Muslims is not to be found anywhere in the Reading). There is no ritual ablution. In 5:6 we are told it is good to wash ourselves up to the elbows, wash the face, and wipe our heads and feet. We must keep ourselves clean. This verse does not say that Sol-laa is a ritual prayer. The verse does not say after we ‘ritually’ clean up ourselves we must start praying ritually.

  2. What about 11:114 where we are told to uphold the Sol-laa at the ends of the day and parts of the night?

    It is a mistake to quote verses out of context. Here, 11:114 should be read from surah 11 verse 112 through to 115. The verse does not say the Sol-laa should be done at two ends of the day and parts of the night. The verse actually says through both ends of the day and parts of the night. The verse is rendered here in its full context:You shall uphold what was prescribed, and also those who repented with you, and not transgress. Indeed, He knows whatever your deeds are, watching. Do not be inclined to those who are wicked. That will make you suffer the Fire, and there is none for you except God as a protector, then you will not be helped. And uphold your commitments (aqimi-Sol-laa-ta) through the ends of the day and the parts of the night. Indeed the good deeds nullify the bad. That is the remembrance for those who want to remember. You shall be steadfast. God never fails to reward the righteous. (11:112-115)The verse clearly says the commitments are ongoing throughout the day and parts of the night. Verses 11:112-115 emphasise the importance of doing good deeds throughout the day and parts of the night by focusing oneself in routines according to what is taught from God’s prescribed decrees. It is a simple instruction.

  3. What about 24:58 where the Solatil fajri and Solatil ‘isha are mentioned?1

    This verse refers to the periods of undress when children must seek permission before entering their parents’ room – from the time the parents retreat to their rooms (Solatil ‘isha) until the next morning (Solatil-fajri). We continue to observe our commitments during our private time. The same verse requires the seeking of permission to enter the room when parents are resting at noon.The Solatil ‘isha and the Solatil-fajri are not the names attributed to any ritual prayers but they are the parents’ private time. Similarly, it is not right for parents to simply walk into their children’s room once they retreat to their rooms. The verse teaches family etiquette, and as part of the obligations we are to teach children to respect their parent’s privacy. There is no ritual prayer mentioned in the verse.

  4. What about 4:103 where God says the Sol-laa-ta are done at specified times?

    It is our duty to do certain deeds at specific times through the day from morning to dusk and also parts of the night, from the sinking of the sun at noon till the darkness of the night. That means 24/7. The verse says we are committed to do certain things at the specified times. We must do what we have to do when it is time and do it diligently.If we are traders we must maintain our commitments not cheat or earn by excessive profiteering. If a beggar or a poor man comes to us at nine in the morning, we should not tell him to come back at 1 o’clock. If our workers have worked for us we should not delay or postpone their wages. If we promise to see somebody at 3.00 p.m. then we should uphold that commitment to the man by meeting him at 3.00 p.m. sharp because God says, ‘They fulfil their promises when they make their promise’. Fulfilling our promises is part of the commitment.

  5. What about 17:110 when you are told to use a moderate tone in your Sol-laa-teka?

    First of all we must read from 17:105-111. In the context we see that 17:110 is about the manner in which we should publicly avow our commitments and call people to God. We are not to go around either with a loud speaker or by being so quiet no one hears us.In 17:110 specifically, the Prophet is asked to use a moderate tone when calling people to God.Say, Call upon God, or call upon the Most Compassionate. Whatever you call, to Him belong the most beautiful names. Neither avows your commitment publicly loudly or quietly, but seek a middle course. (17:110)


1 That is, they say the Morning Prayer and the night prayer. Strangely, the Qur’an mentions the word ‘Salatil-fajri‘ but the Muslims say ‘Salatil-Subhi‘.

How the religionists do the ‘Sol-laa shuffle’

Let us see how the translators are forced to jump from one meaning to another for the same word or the derivatives. I call this The Sol-laa Shuffle.

Form Occurs Explanation
Solaa 3 In 75:31 and 96:10 stated as ritual prayers
faSol-laa 1 In 87:15 & 108:2 stated as ritual prayers.
YuSol-laa 3 In 2:27, 13:21 and 13:25 stated as must tie or connect the relationship with God
Sol-lee 1 In 9:103 stated (with regard To the Prophet) as supplicated or said a prayer for the people, not ritual prayer
tuSol-lee 1 In 9:84 stated as ritual prayer (Do not pray over the hypocrites)
faSol-lee 1 In 108:2 stated ritually pray to your Lord, but in Arabic faSol-laa lirobbika means ‘uphold your commitments for Your Lord.’
yuSol-lee 2 In 3:39 and 33:43
(a) In 33:43 it is means God and the Angels ‘blessed’ the believers. Nothing about ritual prayers.
(b) But in 3:39 it is stated as Zachariah doing the ritual prayers.
Sol-lu 1 In 33:56 stated as the People must Solluu or honour the Prophet. Nothing about ritual prayers.
YuSol-lu 3 Once in 33:56 and twice in 4:102.
(a) In 33:56 stated as God and the angels blessed the Prophet for the word ‘yuSollu’.
(b) In 4:102 the same word is stated as ritual prayers.
YaSilu 5 In 4:90, 6:136 (2), 11:70, 11:81, 13:21 and 8:35 stated as people who connect a relationship with God.
muSollan (sing.) 1 In 2:125 stated as a place of worship, not person who performs ritual prayer.
muSolleen(plur.) 3 In 70:22, 74:43 and 107:4 not stated as places of worship but people who perform ritual prayers.
Sol-laa ta 46 No ritual methods in context.
Sol-laa tee 20 No ritual methods in context.
Sol-laa tu 1 In 62:10 stated as ritual prayers.
Sol-laa taka 1 In 9:103 stated as meaning the Prophet’s ritual prayer makes the people happy. The Reading clearly says that no burdened soul will bear the burden of another. So how can this be?
Sol-laa teka 1 In 17:110 stated as meaning perform your ritual prayer in a moderate tone. But today, the noon and evening prayers of the Arab religion are performed in silence.
Sol-laa tuka 1 In 11:87 stated as the prophet Shuaib’s ritual prayers (in the context of them being able to change the economic system).
Sol-laa tahu 1 24:41 is said by the Arab religion to mean that the birds of the air perform their ritual prayer. Think about that one for a moment…
Sol-laa tehim 5 6:92, 23:2, 70:23, 70:34 and 107:5 are stated with the sense: you can trust those people who perform the ritual prayer, and they also make others understand that the people who perform the ritual prayer will always fulfil their promises in 70:32-35. Experience tends to show otherwise.
Sol-laa tuhum 1 In 8:35 stated as meaning their ritual prayer is nothing but controversy and rebellion.
Solaa-waatee 3 9:99, 2:238 and 23:9.
In 9:99 stated as: their good deeds will take them closer to God and also the ‘Sol-laa-waatee’ (ritual prayer?) of The Prophet. Another illogical statement. If we give food to a hungry man how does that take us closer the Prophet’s ‘ritual prayer’?
In 2:238 stated as meaning we are supposed to safeguard our ‘ritual prayers’ Sol-laa-waatee.
In 23:9 stated as meaning, “They observe their ritual prayers (sola-waa-teehim).” Here the religionists and the u’lema say they can fulfil their promises by performing the ritual prayer, they also say they are trustworthy because they pray ritually. What do you think?
Solaa-waa-tun 2 2:157 and 22:40. 2:157 -were there any consistency – would need to be rendered thus: as ‘upon them shall be ritual prayers from their Lord’, whereas 22:40 renders the word as churches. Some Arabic experts say Sol-laa-waatun in this context means oratories. What in the world is an ‘oratory’ in this context?

This twisting of one root word in the Reading yields many differing definitions, some of which are totally unrelated to the root word. No Arab priest today can provide any logical explanation for this inconsistency. They just regurgitate the Sol-laa Shuffle as a knee-jerk reaction to any challenge on the subject.

The Sol-laa shuffle

In this chapter I will demonstrate how one simple but crucial word from the Reading has been manipulated. As we have seen, Arabic words derive their vocabulary from roots. These can be a bilateral, trilateral or quadrilateral cluster of consonants from which words are formed. The derivatives are, in most cases, constructed in accordance with established vocalic moulds or patterns to which certain prefixes, infixes or suffixes are added. This is the basic foundation of the Arabic grammar.

Theoretically, the roots may be formed from any set of consonants in the language with an addition of a short vowel ‘a’, ‘i’ or ‘u’ after each consonant to generate the ground form (imperfective, active, third person, masculine and singular, e.g. he did). The meaning of this verb is determined by the consonants. Other verbal nouns may be developed from the same root word.

A verb has three states: the perfect and the imperfect (which are tenses) and the imperative, which is a mood. The perfect usually signifies an action that is done and completed at the time of speaking (e.g. he has done). The imperfect signifies an action in the process of being done or completed, or that will be done (e.g. he is doing), and the imperative an order or a command (e.g. do!).

Several grammatical forms derive from the root words to signify the perfect active, imperfect active, imperative, perfect passive, imperfect passive, verbal noun, active participle and passive participles.

Besides the three numbers of singular, dual and plural Arabic recognises three persons: first person (the speaker), second person (the one addressed), and third person (one spoken about).

There are only two genders in Arabic, masculine or feminine. There is no ‘it’. Hence, God is referred in the third person as ‘Him’, ‘His‘ or ‘He’. When we say ‘There is no god except Him‘, it does not mean that God is personified as a male.

While one root can have more than one meaning, there does need to be some consistency in the essence of the fundamental of the way the meanings are approached. Arabic is a clear language. Its very make-up tends to expose abuse of its core rules and structure. It is just such abuse, which has been worked on the word Sol-laa by the religionists.


Related posts:

Ritual prayer is a conspiracy

The religionists conspired against the natural peacefulness or Islam by destroying the revelation as the source of the prescribed covenants between God and mankind. They replaced it with ‘short-cut’ pagan rituals that make people feel a false sense of having upheld their responsibilities (without, of course, having to do any practical, good deeds). Those who observe the ritual prayer five, four, three, twice or once a day are doing it for the religionists and not for God.

This book asserts that Islam is a simple way of life, that the Reading was written for all mankind, and that it is for all the peoples of the world, irrespective of their colour or race. The reader should be slow to draw the inference that to consent to the One God is easy. Simple does not mean easy. In 67:2 it says, ‘God is the one who created life and death in order to test you to distinguish the righteous among you’. In order to qualify we must be willing to change out mindset to free ourselves from the shackles that binds us by taking the challenge to find the way to God’s system. Once we are in His system we will discover the simplicity in conducting our way of life that pleases Him.

Without any scriptural basis, the Arab traditions say that the Last Prophet was called up to the seventh heaven to speak to God about ‘the prayer’. Well, to negotiate with Him to be more exact. God wanted Muslims to pray fifty times a day but Muhammad managed to beat Him down to five. It would seem odd that God’s messenger should question the content of God’s message. It is equally strange that a messenger should choose to intercede on behalf of the addressee of the message. It seems impertinent that a messenger should challenge the will of God.

If negotiations had closed where they began, assuming a 16-hour day we would need to pray once about every 19 minutes. Assuming one set of five prayers requires one to bow and prostrate to the stone idol seventeen times, we would have had the faithful doing a total of 850 separate bowing and prostration movements per day. It would seem that the religionists were the inventors of aerobics. Given this sad state of credulity, it is no wonder that many Muslim nations – whilst bountiful in natural resources – are yet to take their place among the advanced nations. They are too busy trying to find new ways to pray.

This madness has been ascribed Qur’anic legitimacy by the manipulation of 17:1. Taken in isolation, nothing seems amiss. Taken in context, a very different picture emerges. The simple, verifiable truth is that 17:1-7 is a history of the Children of Israel and of the story of Moses who had a meeting with God one night to witness God’s signs.1 (Please see chapter nine).

However, the religionists cannot deny that the word Sol-laa is not even mentioned in the verse. Let us see how the Arab priest contorted a ludicrous story about the heavenly journey only good for a bedtime story.

One night while Muhammad was in a state of between sleep and consciousness an angel appeared to him with a white horse called Buraq and this horse had the face of a woman, peacock-tailed whose every stride carried as far as they naked eye could see. The creature first took him to Jerusalem so that Muhammad could lead a prayer for all the dead prophets from the time of Adam to Jesus. How and when these prophets who died thousands of years appeared in Jerusalem nobody seems to know – but it seems that they don’t communicate with each other. However, when he ascended to the seven heavens he found Adam, Idris, Abraham, Joseph, Moses, Aaron and Jesus waiting for him at every gate from the first heaven. How they reach their respective gates before Muhammad, again, nobody seems to know.

So, how do we continue discussing about an absurd story like this? Although no scholars can say for sure how the old prophets were brought back to live to pray with Muhammad – yet many intelligent people are very sure the trip was about the ritual prayer. Because of that they must perform the ritual prayer – although the details were not decreed in the Reading.


1 There is no information about the ‘METHOD’ of performing the ritual prayer in the Qur’an. The religionists deceived the masses with a fairy tale saying the Last Prophet flew up to the seven heavens to negotiate with God about it and back on earth in one night. From 50 prayers a day, they say it was Moses who instigated Muhammad to demand for discount from God. Although God conceded – perhaps He forgot to tell the last prophet the methods.

Ritual prayer is not in the Qur’an

God did not prescribe a ritual prayer to the Last Prophet or to any of the prophets before him.

The Reading has 114 chapters with 6348 numbered verses. No verse tells the people: you must perform a ritual prayer to God.

  • A ritual prayer is an act of worship. God never tells any of His servants to worship Him.

  • The revelation to the Last Prophet is not a new revelation from God.

  • It is not about religion or worship of God.

  • No priest of the Arab religion has ever said that the details of their ritual prayer can be found in the Reading. Their position is that seeking to obey the Reading alone is a non-starter since one cannot pray five times a day based on the Reading alone since it neither makes such a demand nor gives details of how this should be done. This is the testimony of the Arab priests themselves. They are very proud of their bowing and prostrating to the stone idol every day. They are very proud of the invented religion they promote.

Glorify God through commitments

Glorifying God is everything in the heavens and the earth. He is the Supreme Power, the Sacred, the Almighty, and the Judge. (62:1)

In addition, everything that exists in the universe and the earth is observing its Sol-laa. It knows how to uphold its Sol-laa without the aid of prophets or messengers.

Do you not see that God is glorified by everything in the heavens and the earth as well as the birds in their flight? Surely every one of them knows its own commitments (Sol-laa-ta-hu1) and glorification. God knows what they do. (24:41)

Glorifying Him are the seven heavens and the earth and everything in them. There is nothing that does not praise His Glory, but you do not understand their glorification. He is Clement, Forgiver. (17:44)

The verse clearly says that there is nothing that does not praise His glory. This means all the celestial planets in the sky; the wind, the electro-magnetic forces, and everything in existence beyond human’s comprehension are praising the glory of God all the time. For various reasons people were led to believe that they are required to bow and prostrate physically to God.

Here, the religionists have overstretched themselves. They would have us believe that the word sujud in the Reading means prostrate. However, a logical investigation into uses of this word and the cross reference of similar words with the same root in associated verses show that the word sujud does not – and can not – refer to physical prostration. Sujud simply means being in a state of subservience.

The concept of performing ritual prayer is the result of a false teaching introduced by the pagan Arabs to reduce the status of the Supreme God to that of a local deity. Instead of serving Him by deeds they call everyone to worship Him.


1 God says everything in the heavens and earth glorifies Him and they are doing their Sol-laa including the birds in their flights. These creatures exist as nations like us- but we don’t see them glorifying and doing their Sol-laa through organised religion. This is how God teaches people about His Book making His message clear.

Ask for God’s help without rituals

God is always near. We are told to seek His help directly and we are required to practice patience while continuing to be committed to focusing on the sanctions prescribed by God and to doing good deeds.

When My servants ask you about Me, tell them, “I am very near. I respond to the call of any caller who calls Me.” Therefore, they shall respond to Me, and believe in Me that they may attain guidance. (2:186)

Seek help through steadfastness and be committed, this is difficult indeed, but not for those who are humble and realise that they will meet their Lord. To Him they are returning. (2:45-46)

We must put our trust in the Omnipresent God although we do not see Him. God Himself says it is a difficult thing to do, but not for those who are humble and consider that they will ultimately meet Him. People, however, are weak by nature1, filled with frailties and insecurities. Rituals, customs, and traditions have a soothing and reassuring attraction for us. They function like pacifiers. They lead to worship. The faithful then externalise their fears, hopes, dreams, and desires onto something tangible. It is a lot simpler to go through a ritualised prayer session rather than to have a one-on-one, heart-to-heart, talk to God.

Idolaters put their trust in things: a piece of wood, a cross, a new moon with a star, a rock, a wall, a stone house, a mosque etc. These things help one to focus on a collective idea. There are those who put their trust in people. They magnify their demi-gods and idols through physical acts of worship. It is strange to think that such a simple truth eludes so many: that those who so choose can magnify and be testament to the unseen God simply by upholding their commitment to do good deeds. What could be simpler than being a testament to God by doing good deeds! Be a testament while leading by example. No need to talk about it. Just do it.

When human beings have a need to call upon God they can call upon Him at any time, day or night from absolutely anywhere. Ritual ablution and its attendant processes are unnecessary. In fact, the Reading reminds us that those too proud to call upon God will burn in Hell. If we remember God, He will remember us. It is, after all, a reciprocal relationship.

Your Lord says, “Call upon Me, and I will answer your call. As for those who are too arrogant to serve me, they will be committed to Hell.”(40:60)

Therefore, you shall remember Me2 that I may remember you. And be thankful to Me and do not disbelieve. (2:152)

The calling upon God for help, wisdom, perseverance, assistance, money, guidance or anything at all is part of the conditions in effect for a person serving God. The offer of assistance and guidance has been given, yet many will call upon their messengers, saints – their dead idols in the graves – and some even call upon the jinn.

The other side of the coin is our way of remembering God. Intelligent, sentient beings are not in need of a set of body movements in order to reflect on the wonders of God:

In the creation of the heavens and the earth, and the alteration of night and day, there are signs for those who possess intelligence, who remember God: while standing up, sitting down and lying on their sides. They reflect upon the creation of the heavens and the earth, and they say, “Our Lord, You did not create all these in vain. Glory be to You, so spare us the agony of the hell-fire.” (3:190-191)

To Him belongs everything in the heavens and the earth, and those with Him are never too arrogant to serve Him, nor do they tire. They glorify Him day and night. (21: 20)

Everything was created in perfect balance. Those who are close to Him glorify Him day and night. This is not accomplished by the performance of random pantomimed movements. They do this by adhering to a higher code of behaviour and being a testament to their God.

Zachariah made a special request from God to grant him a son. After granting the request, the energy that delivered the news told him to remember and to glorify God day and night. God did not ask him to pray ritually. In 3:41 Zachariah initiates a communication with God directly by saying, “My Lord, grant me a sign.” An unknown energy assigned by God to deliver the good news then said, “Your sign is that you will not be able to speak to the people for three days except by signal. You shall remember your Lord frequently and glorify Him night and day.”

We are required to magnify God as a means of serving Him in our daily routine. We are advised to be patient in the face of false accusations, slander or gossip by our enemies, for example. In 20:130 we are told, “Therefore, be patient in the face of their utterances, and praise the glory of your Lord before sunrise and before sunset, also during parts of the night and through both ends of the day, that you may attain happiness.”

We do not have to ritualise the methods of calling, praising, remembering, or glorifying God. We do it by magnifying Him in our heart constantly or by speaking to Him softly. We can remember Him while driving, walking, standing, sitting or lying on our sides any time of the day.


1 God wishes to make things easy for you, since the human being is weak in nature (4:28)

2 In 29:45 it says be committed to the orderly way of life to remember God. Our relationship with the creator is through the ‘remembrance’ of Him not through ritual prayer. He has provided us with all the signs in the heaven and earth. A good example is being provided in 3:190-194.

Muhammad’s commitment

We saw in verse 6:160 above that Muhammad was following the order of Abraham. The Reading is not a new revelation or a new guidance from God. It is the same set of decrees prescribed to Abraham and Moses. The essence of all the Scriptures is the same.

In-naa haza lafi suhufil ulaa, suhufi ibrohim wa-musaa. (87:18-19)

Indeed, this is what is in the Scriptures of old, the Scriptures of Abraham and Moses. (87:18-19)

We have seen that Abraham used the word Sol-laa in his own language, Moses in his and Jesus in his. The word Sol-laa appears for the first time in the Reading at 2:2-3:

That book is infallible, a guide for those who are observant, they believe in the unseen and uphold their commitments (Sol-laa-ta) and from Our provisions to them they give. (2:2-3)

The word Sol-laa at the beginning of surah 2 refers to those who are observant and believe in the unseen God. They are committed to the tenets in the Quran and they are charitable to others. This is part of their commitment. Reading further, one sees verses detailing additional commitments. 2:4 says, ‘They believe in what was revealed to you from your Lord, and what was revealed before you, and they are positively certain about the Hereafter’. We should also note: it also says ‘those who believe in the previous Scripture’ which means, there is a link between the Reading and the previous revealed Books.

Those who believe that the Reading is from God are committed to accepting the whole of it. The word Sol-laa in verse 2:3 cannot mean ritual prayer because we cannot do charity through ritual prayers and we do not believe in God’s books through ritual prayers.

If we believe the Scripture, we will see all the prescribed decrees in the Book. With God’s blessing, He will open up our hearts to peacefulness when our hearts say, ‘We hear and we obey’. That is the moment when we enter into agreement with God:

You shall be appreciative of God’s blessing upon you and uphold the covenant He has made with you when you said, “We hear and we obey.” You shall observe God, and God is fully aware of your innermost thoughts. (5:7)

We do not see our Creator, but the Reading says His power is able to know our innermost thoughts. The moment our heart says we hear and we obey to His prescribed way we have agreed to uphold our Sol-laa.

Recite what is revealed upon you from the Scripture and uphold the commitments (or to what you have committed to i.e the revealed tenets you read from the scripture). Surely your commitments will keep you from evil and it is also for the remembrance of God, which is even greater. (29:45)

The explanation in the bracket is my own. God assures us in 29:45 that if we recite His Scripture and commit ourselves to the values prescribed by Him – it will keep us from doing bad things or getting involved in evil works. It is a method of remembering Him, which is a great achievement. In other words, one way of remembering God is through upholding our commitments of the Quranic teachings and keep the teachings pure at all time – maintain such attitude as an ongoing process as a way of life ‘from sunrise to sunset and during parts of the night’. For as long as we remember Him we are committed to doing good deeds in our lives.

You shall uphold what was prescribed to you, and also those who repented with you, and not transgress. Indeed, He knows whatever your deeds are, watching. Do not incline to those who are wicked. That will make you suffer the Fire. And there is none for you except God as a protector and you will not be helped. And uphold your commitments (aqimi-Sol-laa-ta) through the ends of the day and the parts from the night. Indeed the good deeds nullify the bad. That is the remembrance for those who want to remember. You shall be steadfast. God never fails to reward the righteous. (11:112-115)

The meaning of Sol-laa in the above verses is crystal clear. It has nothing to do with ritual prayers. The Sol-laa is to be observed as a means of remembering our Lord the Creator and to commit ourselves to doing good deeds which will obviously nullify all the negative elements in our life. There is nothing magical about the process.

Jesus’ commitments

The Children of Israel created the Jewish religion after they had distorted the Scripture revealed to Moses. The following verse says God will be with them for as long as they commit themselves (Sol-laa-ta) in believing God’s messenger and to lend God a loan of righteousness by upholding the covenant they made with Him.

God has taken a covenant from the Children of Israel and We appointed for them twelve disciples; and declared, “I will be with you for as long as you ‘observe your commitments and keep them pure’ (aqom-tumuz-Sol-laa-ta-wa-atai-tumuz-Zakaa) and believe My messengers and support them. And lend God a righteous loan of righteousness. I will forgive your wrongdoings, and admit you into gardens with flowing streams. Anyone who disbelieves after this has indeed strayed off the right path. Because they violated their covenant, we put a curse on them, and We hardened their hearts. Consequently they distorted the scripture given to them, and disregard parts thereof. You will always see betrayal from them, except a few. You shall forgive and forget (the few), for God loves the compassionate. (5:12-13)

Jesus the son of Mary was sent to them with the purpose of demolishing this artificial Jewish religion. He was strengthened with the Holy Spirit and demonstrated miracles as signs that he was from God. He told the people he was enjoined to commit himself to undertaking the re-establishment of the laws of the Torah. It is self-evident that he spoke in his own language (which is rendered in Arabic in the Reading). What he said is found in the Reading as Sol-laa-ti-wa-zakaa-ti. The following statement was made while he was in the cradle:

Waja’al-lani mubarokah ainama kontu wa-ausorni bis-Sol-laa-ti wa-zakaa-ti ma-dumtu hiya (19:31)

And He makes me blessed wherever I go and He enjoined the obligations and purity upon me for as long as I live. (19:31)

When Jesus, son of Mary said wa-ausomi bis-Sol-laa-ti he did not mean I was enjoined with the ritual prayer but I was enjoined with the commitments to reform the Children of Israel, calling them to return to the original law given to Moses. He asked them to abolish the Jewish religion. That was his commitments. From the day he was born God gave him the knowledge of the scripture and the wisdom.

Moses’ commitments

Moses was chosen from among the Children of Israel to free them from the oppression of Pharaoh. Before they left Egypt, they were told to keep a low profile and use their homes as their base to uphold their commitments. Again the word Sol-laa-ta is used for commitments.

We inspired Moses and his brother, “Let your people confine themselves to their homes in Egypt, and let them consider their homes their base, and let them uphold their commitments (Sol-laa-ta)1, and give the good news to the believers.” (10:87)

Moses and those who believe with him were committed to spread the good news to the people – which was their Sol-laa. After they were saved from Egypt, Moses and his people were told to continue to fulfil the covenants by upholding their commitments and to keep them pure. We see the same words used in this context: Sol-laa-ta and zakaa:

Wa-iz aqodz-na misha qor bani-Israela la-ta’budu-na ilal-lah wa-bil-walidai-ni ih-sanan wa-zil-qurba, wal yatama, wal-masakini, wa-qulu-lin-nas husnan, wa-aqimus-Sol-laa-ta wa-atu-zakaa’-ta. (2:83)

And We made a covenant with the Children of Israel: you shall not serve any other than God. And be charitable to your parents and your relatives and the orphans and the poor. And speak to people amicably, and uphold the commitments and keep them pure (Sol-laa-ta-wa-atu-zakaa). (2:83)

The Children of Israel were to serve God by honouring their parents and relatives and the orphans and the poor and speaking amicably to people. These were their commitments. God was not telling them to pray ritually and to pay tithes.


1 A good example Sol-laa does not mean ritual prayer. Moses were reminded with the same word Sol-laa a few times – In this verse he and his people were told to keep a low profile in their homes and continue to commit themselves to pass the good news from God.

Abraham’s commitment

There is nothing new about people upholding the commitment to do good deeds as in the way of life prescribed by God in the Reading. It is not an innovation of the Last Prophet. Mankind has been enjoined to observe its commitments from the time of Abraham. God called Abraham the ‘committed man’. He served the one God by upholding his obligations through God’s prescribed Way of life or deen-nil-lah.

Wat-taqizu min-maqam-mi Ibrohim-ma mu-Sol-lan. (2:125)

Take from the status of Abraham the Committed (2:125)

Please note the word ‘Mu-Sol-lan‘ in this verse. It refers to the state of being of an active participle. For instance, Salam is peace, Muslim is the state peace of an active participle, Muslimin for many men and Muslimat for many women. Similarly, Sol-laa is to commit, Mu-Sol-lan is the singular proper noun. Mu-Sol-leen is the plural, Mu-Sol-leemat refers to many women.

Abraham settled his offspring on a barren valley and he wished for them to live according to God’s prescribed sanctions in the system so that they too could uphold their commitments – or Sol-laa-ta.

Rob-bana inni askantu min-zuriati bawadi ghoi-ri zar-ghain I’nda-baiti-kal mu-Harami. Rob-bana li-yu-qimus-Sol-laa-ta. (14:37)

My Lord, indeed I am settling my progeny in this valley without vegetation by Your sanctioned system. My Lord, let them uphold their commitments. (14:37)

Those who wish to be right with God are told to commit in similar fashion:

Say, the truth has come from God, and you shall follow the principle of Abraham, a sincere monotheist, he never associated any idols with God. (3:95)

The religionists and the u’lema would do well to meditate on the following verse which Muhammad was told to say, revealed in plain Arabic:

Indeed, My Lord has guided me in a straight path, the principle of Abraham, the sincere. He never was an idol-worshipper.” (6:161)

There is no doubt that after such a declaration, any form of idol-worship is completely out of the question.

Sol-laa is about doing deeds

Everything that a person does should be for God. We are not asked to perform any rituals or to pray to Him or to worship Him. All that is enjoined upon us is to believe in God, be sincere in serving Him by upholding our commitments and do good works. Ritual prayers and worship are the pagans’ shortcut to give idol-worshippers a sense of satisfaction that they have discharged their obligations to God when what is really required of them is that they discharge their Sol-laa amongst fellow humans and themselves.

According to the Reading, the main essence of the message revealed to Abraham and Moses is:

No burdened soul will bear the burden of another1, and every person is responsible for what he or she does. For whatever things that they do, it will be witnessed, and they will be fully repaid. (53:36-41)

In other words, each minute thought and deed is taken into account and recorded. God is recording all the deeds (and not the regimented mutterings) of His servants.

Since We created the human being, We are fully aware of his innermost thoughts. We are closer to him than his jugular vain. The two energies at right and left are recording all his deeds. Not a single utterance does he utter without a vigilant watcher. (50:16-18)

The majority of people do not believe God is omnipresent and that He can be with every human all the time, twenty-four hours a day. However, He knows every single thing a person does, even his innermost thoughts. No one person can hide anything from the Supreme Being. Everything is recorded. In the Hereafter, they are told to read their own record of what they have done to themselves.

You will see every congregation humbled. Every congregation will be invited to view its own record. Today you will be paid for your deeds. This is the record pronouncing the truth about you. Indeed, We have recorded all your deeds. (45:28-29)

Ritual prayer, unfortunately for those who put their faith in it, is not in the category of good deeds. What it is, is a form of religious worship, which goes against the essence of God’s revelations.

It is absurd to imagine a world where regimented prayers have moral precedence over good deeds. Besides, one can look around the world and see many places where people regularly perform ritual prayers and where serious crimes abound: rape, sexual abuse, cheating, stealing and corruption. These people ignore the priorities:

You shall uphold what was prescribed, and also those who repented with you, and not transgress. Indeed, He knows whatever your deeds are, watching. Do not be inclined to those who are wicked – they will make you suffer the Fire, and there is none for you except God as a protector. Then you will not be helped. And uphold your commitments (aqimi-Sol-laa-ta) through the ends of the day and the parts from the night. Indeed the good deeds nullify the bad. That is the remembrance for those who want to remember. You shall be steadfast. God never fails to reward the righteous. (11:112-114)

The verse clearly says we are to uphold what has been prescribed, and not transgress. God is recording all deeds. People must fulfil their commitment to do righteous deeds through the ends of the day and parts of the night. The concept is simple. Good deeds will nullify the bad and this is one way to remember God. Deeds can never be fulfilled through a fixed number of ritual prayers. If the concept of deen is correctly understood, it is clear to the devout Muslim that it is incumbent upon him to commit to these instructions, uphold and observe them. A simple definition of righteous deeds is clearly prescribed in the Reading and it does not include the act of worship or the performance of religious rituals.

Righteousness is not the turning of your faces towards the east or the west. But righteousness is to believe in God, the Hereafter, the energies, the Scripture and the prophets. And to donate of one’s wealth despite one’s love thereof to relatives, the orphans, the needy, those who are in hardship, to beggars, and to free mental enslavement by upholding the commitments and keeping them pure. And to keep the promises that are made, and to remain steadfast in the face of adversity, hardship, and war. These are truthful, these are righteous. (2:177)

The problem arises when a person’s mind is pre-conditioned to believe that Sol-laa means ritual prayer. Thus, righteous deeds are totally ignored. One so conditioned often insists that Sol-laa does mean ritual prayer, although a contextual study of the subject demonstrates that such a position does not make any sense.

Surah 107 is a very short chapter with only seven verses the name of which is Charity. A person who commits himself to the prescribed deen should not neglect his commitment to do charity and good deeds as a way of life.

Do you not notice those who are lying with the deen? They neglect the orphans. They do not advocate the feeding of the poor. Therefore curses be on those who are obliged, while heedless of their commitments. They only show off, and they are averse to charity. (107:1-7)

The religionists and the u’lema believe that God is cursing2 the people who pray ritually. They then teach their values to others who will listen without question – just as they did. Compare this rendition with that sanctioned by the religionists’ twisting culture:

Do you know who the rejecters of faith are? They neglect the orphans. They do not advocate the feeding of the poor. Therefore a curse be on those who pray ritually, while heedless of their ritual prayers. They only show off. And they are averse to charity. (107:1-7)

All seven verses are interrelated: taking care of the orphans, feeding the poor and carrying out charity work can only be fulfilled by the deeds of a committed person. The religionists say God is cursing those who pray whilst heedless of their prayer. They encourage their followers to pray ritually in order to solve the problem of the orphans, the poor and in lieu of charitable work. Instead of committing themselves individually and collectively to taking care of orphans, the poor and to doing charity from their own earnings, the Arabs trained their priests in the Arab religion to become income generators. They take illegal collections from the people by corrupting the word zakaa in the Reading to mean religious tithes.3 The Reading spells out other examples of good deeds to be observed by those who are committed to the prescribed way of life from God:

Successful indeed are the believers, who are upright in their commitments (Sol-laa-ti-hem) those who avoid vain talk, those who keep it pure, they guard their chastity except with their wives, and with those who rightfully belong to them do they have sex without being blamed. (23:1-6)

They are trustworthy when it comes to deposits entrusted to them, or the promises they make, and they constantly uphold their obligations (Solawa-ti-hem) (23:8-9)

In this verse it clearly says that those who avoid vain talk, guard their chastity and commit themselves to these values as a way of life are the successful believers. Additionally, they uphold their obligations diligently in fulfilling what they have promised and they are trustworthy when it comes to deposits entrusted to them. In other words, the Reading emphasises sincerity and honesty through deeds – not through ritual prayer. Unfortunately, we seldom see these good values in the Arab religion. Be that as it may, each time the word Sol-laa or the derivatives from this root word appears in the Reading, it appears in the context of good deeds that people are encouraged to uphold.

A further example:

They fulfil their promises to God and they do not violate their covenant. They linked (ya-Siluu) with it what had been commanded so that it binds (ai-yu-Sol-laa) as they are concerned about their Lord and they fear the dreadful reckoning and they steadfastly persevere in seeking their Lord’s grace. They uphold the commitments (Sol-laa-ta) and they give to charity from Our provisions to them secretly and publicly. They counter evil with good. They have deserved the ultimate abode. (13:21-22)

Here the two letter root Sod Lam signifies the fundamental meaning of ‘link’ for the word ya-Siluu whereas ai-yu-Sol-laa denotes the ‘binding’ and Sol-laa-ta is the proactive ‘commitment’. A person upholds his covenant with God by committing himself in doing the deeds that binds him. The meaning of ‘aqor-mus-Sol-laa-ta’ in this context is to ‘uphold the commitment’ for the covenant. It is ridiculous to assume that we uphold our covenant with God just through ritual prayers everyday.

In 23:1-9 quoted earlier the religionists has deliberately corrupted the meaning of the words ‘Sol-laa-ti’ and ‘Solawa-ti’ in these verses to mean ‘ritual prayer’. They trained their blind followers to ignore the context of the subject completely. Instead, they encourage their followers to concentrate on ritual prayers.


1 This is the fundamental concept of God’s orderly way of life sanctioned to all prophets. Unfortunately Rabbis, pope, priests, monks and mullahs say they can cleanse people’s soul. Only God can cleanse people including the freaks in religious garbs. In 33:15 it says, “No soul will bear the burden of another, when a burdened soul implores for help, nothing can be unloaded, not even by a close relative. So, what are these religious morons doing in our life?

2 This is the most ridiculous way of thinking – obviously not to the priests of the Arab religion.

3 See chapter six.

Sol-laa to yourself

The other clear example from the Reading is about the Sol-laa observed by you for yourself – it is for your own good. In this case you are told to commit to the good values by refraining from the practice of excessive profiteering.

God diminishes profiteering (riba) but encourages charity and God dislikes the disbelievers who are guilty. Surely, those who practice righteousness and uphold their commitments (Sol-laa-ta) and keep them pure (wa-a-tuz-zakaa), for them are rewards from their Lord. And there will be no fear upon them nor will they grieve. O you who believe, beware of God, refrain from taking what remains from profiteering if you truly believe in God. (2:276-279)

The subject of riba1 (or profiteering) begins at 2:275 and ends at 2:281. Profiteering is a condemned practice and we are commanded not to get involved with it. God degrades profiteering, encourages charity and He dislikes the guilty disbelievers (2:276). Instead He commands virtuous commitments that should be observed (Sol-laa-ta) and kept pure (2:277). Any involvement in profiteering should be stopped immediately, even if there are any balances owed (2:278). Otherwise God and His messenger will wage war (2:279). If a debtor is in difficulty, we are to give him time, otherwise, treat the debt as charity (2:280) whatever we do, God knows everything and we are to beware of the Last Day. (2:281)

The Sol-laa-ta2 mentioned at 2:277 is our commitment to stop earning income from profiteering (riba) and to maintain our commitments by abstaining from such practices. We do not perform ritual prayer to abstain from profiteering; instead we commit ourselves (Sol-laa-ta) by sacrificing our greed by doing the practical, good deeds prescribed by God and fulfil our commitment to ourselves.

The phrase ‘Wa-Aqimus-Sol-laa-tawaa-Atuz-Zakaata’ or observe your commitments and keep it pure appears in the middle of the subject of profiteering.


1 Some foolish scholars say Bank interest is Riba. They created the Islamic Banking and used the same Base Lending Rate like other Commercial Banks. What they actually did was – they use Arabic term for all transactions – and call it Islamic. Today many commercial banks earn more interest through this system and most of them have set up a special unit to service their Muslims customers who prefer to borrow money in Arabic. For the fools – Arabic means Islamic.

2 Sol-laa is never pronounced Salaat. Today, when the mosque announces the five daily prayers they say “Hai-ya-‘alaa-Sol-laa“. Salaat is a profane word not found in the Qur’an, which the Arabs and the u’lemas have invented and attributed to God.

Sol-laa between people

We can support the fact that the Reading does not mean ritual prayer by the word Sol-laa and its derivatives by examining the different usage of this word in the Reading in its various contexts. What transpires is that Sol-laa has to be observed by everyone – even by the non-believers and the idol-worshippers.

One very clear example regards the witnessing of a will by strangers:

O you who believe, you shall have witnesses when death is near to any one of you: to dictate your will in the presence of two equitable persons among you, or strangers in case there is a sudden danger to your life when travelling on the earth. If you are not certain of them, retain them after they have committed themselves (Sol-laa-ti) to make them both swear by God, “We will not take advantage to favour anyone even the closest relatives. We will not conceal any evidence before God. If we do, the sin will be upon us.”1 (5:106)

The verse says: ‘After the two strangers [note: who can be Jews or Christians] commit themselves (Sol-laa-ti), make them both swear by God’. This does not call for the performance of a ritual prayer in the presence of a dying person. Instead they are taking on the responsibility of being witnesses to a will by making a solemn pledge to the person before God. This is an example of Sol-laa-ti (the commitment) between people.

The commitment between people is to fulfil such obligations before the one God. It is that simple.B

Besides upholding the Sol-laa with strangers, believers may also do so with non-believers, and idol-worshippers. Surely, the following passages in the Reading are not meant to suggest that polytheists perform the ritual prayers:

Except those among the idol-worshippers with whom you have a treaty and then do not breach anything with you and do not aid anyone against you, therefore complete your agreement with them until its term. Surely, God loves those who fear (Him). (9:4)

Once the restricted months are over, you may confront the idol worshipers wherever you encounter them, agitate them, provoke them and keep after them. However if they repent and observe their commitment and keep them pure (aqimus-Sol-laa-ta-waa-tuz-zakaa), then you shall pardon them. God is forgiver and merciful. (9:5)

And if one of the idol-worshippers seeks help from you, protect him then let him hear God’s words then convey him to a place of safety. This is because they are a people who do not know. (9:6)

At 9:4–6 we are directed to treat the idol-worshippers well and even convey them to a place of safety. Those that we shelter may remain idol-worshippers. We are charged not with discriminating upon the basis of this prejudice. Rather, we are commanded to be a beacon of light and understanding. Understanding and carrying out the commandment in this verse alone would change the entire Islamic landscape as we know it.

We see that if and when the polytheists repent and agree to peace, it is the people who are at peace or Muslims’ duty to uphold that peace and grant them their freedom. Again, the Reading enjoins civility and kindness in the face of hostilities. Islam does not condone the mistreatment of those who are under our power or control (9:5). Ultimately, Sol-laa-ta in this instance refers to the idol-worshippers agreeing to keep to their end of the bargain.

The prophet Shuaib provides another example of Sol-laa clearly signifying commitments. He committed himself to reform his people. Those who rejected his commitments challenged him.

He begins:

O my people! Gives full measure and full weight equitably. Do not cheat people out of their things, and do not corrupt the earth. A smaller provision from God would be better for you, if you are really believers. I am not a guardian over you.” They said, “O Shuaib, does your Sol-laa (commitment) prevent us from idolising what our parents have idolised, and from doing whatever we want with our money? Surely you are too clement and too wise.” (11:85–87)

The commitment that Shuaib was trying to bind upon his people was that they should not cheat or corrupt the earth. It was a simple precept that was not accepted by his peers. Hence, they said to Shuaib:

O Shuaib, does your commitment (Sol-laa-tu-ka) prevent us from idolising what our parents have idolised, and from doing whatever we want with our money?”2

Sol-laa here clearly refers to committing to good deeds and upholding a good moral order. The commitment called for his people not to cheat, not to corrupt the earth, and to be fair. There is no other reading without abusing the sense in the text beyond belief.

What we can better understand, however, is why the Arab priests themselves emphatically declare that the Reading has no information at all about the five daily prayers (thus contradicting themselves on what they proclaim to be the first absolute pillar of the religion of Islam) – because they are right! Their own lips condemn them. There is no such thing as the five daily prayers. How woefully correct and wrong they are at the same time.


1 The two men are strangers to the dying man, yet the verse says they qualify to make an oath before God. Their willingness to write the will and to become witness is their commitment ‘Sol-laa-ti’. Like the Jews, the Arab religionists conceal this verse from their followers.

2 Clearly the word Sol-laa here does not refer to ritual prayer.

Sol-laa (commitments) is not ritual prayer

 

When looking at other words which have had their meanings twisted in the Qur’anic context, we can usually get back to the true meaning by looking at extant words in modern Arabic surrounding the root. Zakaa is a good example. All the root meanings of zakaa refer to purity and sincerity. This can be verified by looking at any good dictionary. As we shall see – the Arab religion has created the un-Qur’anic tax and ascribed this to the word zakaa. The deception is relatively easy to spot since the key meanings of the word zakaa have remained intact.

Sol-laa is no different. Before we continue let me clarify why I use the word Sol-laa instead of the common term Salaat. Firstly, when we read the Reading in Arabic it is always pronounced as ‘Aqimus-Sol-laa– taa-wa-aatuz-Zakaa’ – nobody says ‘Aqimus-Salaat-taa-wa-aatuz-Zakat’. This is evident even during the call of prayer. All over the world – the person who announces the prayer will shout on top of his voice with ‘Hai-ya-‘alas-Sol-laa’ – never as ‘Hai-ya-‘alas-Salaat’. Muslims know this word is pronounced the way it is spelt in the Reading – Arabs or not.

This is only to demonstrate that – there is a difference between God’s Arabic in the Reading and the Arabic language spoken by the Arabs, and for this study I have chosen to use the former i.e. God’s Arabic

When we look up the word in a dictionary we find a word that is mispronounced by the Muslim world – Salaat – under the root S-l-w. It is worth noting that this root has no other meaning directly ascribed to it other than the ‘ritual prayer’. There is nothing else.

Whereas almost any key Qur’anic term has related terms which balance and integrate it into the waft and web of the language (and by means of which we can sense deceptions as and when they occur) this important – some would say central – Qur’anic concept has no ‘context’ in the language by which to verify the claims made for it by the Arab religionists other than the one created for it by those self-same religionists.

There are no related meanings that one can point to and say: Sol-laa must mean what such-and-such because it integrates into the language on the basis of the sense we derive from the word. This is not possible because the word simply has no semantic context in the religion of the Arabs as we know.

Now, it could be argued that the reason for this is that this word has only one meaning – unconnected to anything else in the vast and interconnected web of Arabic semantics – and that the meaning the Arab religionists ascribe to it is, in fact, the correct one. In this case, we would respond by pointing out that since the ritual prayer or Salaat (by the religionists’ own measure and admission) is not in the Reading, their own definition of it is of no special value.

The situation we find ourselves in is: there is a word – ‘Sol-laa– that exists in a semantic vacuum, and the leaders of the religious system say it means X based on their non-Qur’anic writings (the Hadith). Since their non-Qur’anic writings say some patently ludicrous things, and given that the religious elite promotes these non-Qur’anic sources to achieve ends which are usually advantageous only to the religious elite, a thinking person is left wondering what possible use their definition of this word can be to anyone except them.

Just to clear up the point of roots. The root of Sol-laa is S-L. It is a two-root word. They are many such words in the Reading. Examples of other two-root words found in the Reading are haq (truth, root: h-q), abu (father, root: a-b) or yad (hand, root: y-d) or Qama (the keep vigil or attentive, root: q-m).

However, knowing that the word Sol-laa does not come from S-l-w or S-l-y but from S-L it does not help us a great deal. S-L is not in the dictionary and S-l-w has only the ‘ritual prayer’ meaning ascribed to it. In the Reading S-l-w means ‘to roast’ and (S-l-y) refers to ‘fry or burn’.

The root word for S-l-w is found in 69:31 meaning ‘to roast’ not ritual prayer. It generates yaslau (4:10, 14:29, 17:18 and eight other verses). islau in 36:64 & 52:16, siliya in 19:70 spelt with S-l-alif-y. Here we must pronounce the word with the third letter ‘waw’ or ‘ya’. Therefore it is wrong to assign a third letter to the root of S-L to read as S-l-w.

To recap: Sol-laa comes from the root S-L which does not exist in modern Arabic and which defies definition by modern methods. Yet the Reading treats its meaning as self-evident. The religious elite have ascribed its own meaning to this word, a meaning which fails appallingly in certain Qur’anic contexts.

Since the Reading is the only place we know of which knows what this word means we have to look to it for the ways it uses this word and derive its meaning from the multitude of contexts. God says the Arabic in His Book is perfect. Thus, nobody should try to change its word constructions, spelling and grammatical forms.

A reading in Arabic without any crookedness therein so that they might observe. 39:28

The word Sol-laa[1]  or any of the derivatives from the same root word is never used in the Reading to refer to the act of worship or the performance of a set of body movements.

Its use always refers to the act of honouring, upholding, dedicating or observing of commitments, obligations, accountabilities, responsibilities etc. by consenting person or persons when the phrase ‘aqi-mu‘ is used. Literally the word Sol-laa means to ‘commit’.

This root word (like all roots in Arabic) forms its various functions by use of vowels, prefixes and suffixes. The short vowels “i” or “u” (9:103,108:2 and 33:56) can be added resulting in ‘Sol-lee’ or ‘Sol-luu’ without changing the underlying, fundamental meaning of the word.

The word pronounced with a short vowel ‘a’ appears in the Reading twice, in 75:31 and 96:10 respectively.

In 96:10 it appears as “ ‘Abdan Ezaa Sol-laa” which means “A servant who is committed”. The context of this verse begins from 96:8-12 with the message “Indeed to your Lord is the final return. What do you think of those who prevent a servant who commits? What if he is actually on the right path, advocating people to be observant?” The message is clear. But translators give different meanings to this word for reasons only known to them.

In 75:31 it is written as Falla-sod-daqor-wa-Sol-laa and translators insist the word Sol-laa in both verses refers to ritual prayers. Obviously when we read the context, they do not make any sense at all.

This word pronounced with different vowels or prefixes appear in other passages of the Reading, and no religionists or Arabic scholars dare translate them as ‘ritual prayers’.  So the best one can say is, consistencies exist because the leaders of the Arab religion interpret this root concept in various ways. The paragraphs following will attempt to explain this particular quirk.

As mentioned, the Arabic language derives its vocabulary from the root words. Conjugations of the root word can produce new derivatives and generally, these derivatives are constructed in accordance with established vocalic moulds or patterns to which certain prefixes or suffixes are added. The Arabic verbs have two ‘voices’ – active and passive.

Derivational and inflexional forms make the Arabic language extensive. This complexity is matched by the regularity and symmentry of the form and is very logical and regular. There are almost no regular forms in the language. In addition to two tenses, perfect and imperfect, there are imperative forms, active and passive, and also energetic forms. Sol-laa or commit for example has many derivatives to form other words with the same shades of meaning like, binding, obligations, compulsion, pledge or promise etc.

Sol-laa                    Commit

Sol-luu                    Be committed

Sol-lee                    Binding

Mu-Sol-lan             A person who is committed

Mu-Sol-leen           Many people who are committed

Yu-Sol-laa              They commit

Yu-Sol-lee              Their commitments

Yu-Sol-luu              They have committed

Ya-sil-luu                Bind

Solaa-ta                   Commitment (singular)

Solaa-tee                Commitments (dual)

Solaa-tu                  Commitments (Aorist)

Solaa-waa-tee         Obligatorily

Solaa-waa-tun         obligatory

Arabic in the Reading then, it is fair to say, is a highly developed language with a complex grammar via which it is possible to express concepts with a high level of accuracy. Unlike Latin, Old Greek, Aramic, or Sanskrit, Arabic of the Quran is a living language, spoken, written and understood by millions people around the globe. There are scholars and religionists who insist that Arabic in the Reading lacks the ability to define sense exactly because they realize – once the message of the Quran is made clear to the people all their belief and preaching will be in vain, for example they translated the word Sol-laa-ta as the mandatory Arab ritual prayers to be observed by Muslims only. But in the Quran the same word is also attributed for people of the past like Abraham, Moses, and Jesus, the disbelievers, strangers and others including the animal kingdom. I will explain in the next chapter how they shuffle this word by creating absurd meanings.       

There are many lessons to be learned from the Quran especially about the previous people who received God’s revelations. One such community is the Children of Israel, who agreed to uphold their commitments upon receiving God’s covenant, and we are told they violated it by distorting ‘His words’ in the scripture (2:59) to create a new religion of Judaism. We see the Arab religionists are doing exactly the same when they translate the Arabic words in the Quran to other languages. Although they have successfully introduced the manipulated meanings of many words into the translated Quran, but certainly they cannot change the original Arabic in the Quran, no matter how hard they try. God in His wisdom gave us His assurance in 15:9 that “He will preserve what He revealed”. The outcome of any attempt to change His words, the spellings, or even modifying its grammar will result the translations riddled with contradictions defying all logics.

However, the subsequent twisting of the meanings of the original Arabic in the Quran by those who would force it into a pre-prescribed shape has marred many people’s reading of the book. For instance, we read in 75:31: falaa soddaqor walaa Sol-laa. The patrons of the Arab religion say it means ‘He was not truthful and not praying’. The true meaning is ‘He was not truthful and not committed’. Let us examine this word “Sol-laa” when it is used in other passages.

 

For example, in 2:43 God tells us that He instructed the Children of Israel: Wa-aqimus Sol-laa-ta wa-atuz zakaa. The religionists say it means: ‘Observe the ritual prayers and pay the religious tithes’. This instruction is spoken in the present tense, and if we read the context from 2:40 to 2:43 we will realize that God reminds the Children of Israel to commit to what they have committed before – i.e to uphold the covenant and maintain the purity of its tenets. He calls them to believe in what is revealed in the Quran confirming what they have, and do not trade away God’s revelations for a cheap gain. The message is simple and straightforward. God never asked the Children of Israel to perform the ritual prayers as suggested by the religionists. As a matter of fact if we ask the Jews if they had at any time in history performed the five daily ritual prayers, they will answer in the negative.  Even the Jews who received the earlier Scripture knew that five the ritual prayers were not part of the deen revealed by God. It is not in the Torah and it is also not the Reading. Our common sense can easily tells us the true meaning of this particular passage is: ‘Uphold the commitments and keep them pure’. The Children of Israel understand this instruction very well because they have committed themselves to God’s deen through the Torah long before the Quran was revealed.

In 6:162, the Prophet and those who consented themselves to God are encouraged to remind themselves of their obligation as servants of God: In-naa Sol-laa-ti wa-nusuki wamaa yahya wamamamati lilahi robil a’lameen. This means: My commitments and my sacrifices and my life and my death are for God the Lord of the Universe. The religionists twist their tongue and say this verse means, ‘My ritual prayers and my sacrifices and my life and my death are for God the Lord of the Universe’.

Among the previous people who use the word Sol-laa in the Reading are the people of Shuaib. At 11:87 they say, ‘Ya-shu-’aib aa-Sol-laa-tu-ka…..’ which means, ‘O Shuaib, does your commitment…?’.  But in the Arab religion they say the people of Shuaib said, ‘O Shuaib, does your ritual prayer..…..?’, even though the context of this passage says that Shuaib was calling his people not to cheat but to trade equitably among themselves.

The history of Jesus in the Reading is another clear example. Jesus mentions the word Sol-laa as an infant. In 19:23 we are told that Jesus was born of the Virgin Mary and he spoke to his mother soon after the pangs surprised her. The religionists ridiculously claim that Jesus performed the ritual prayer and paid the alms tax from the day he was born. At 19:31 whilst in his mother’s arms Jesus says, “I was enjoined with the commitments maintain it pure for as long as I live” (‘Wa-asoy-na bi-Sol-laa-ti wa zakaa-ti ma dumtum hai-yan’) which clearly implies that he will uphold his obligation diligently in reforming the Children of Israel.

Different words were used in various languages during over the centuries of prophets calling people to uphold their commitments or obligations. In the language of the Last Prophet it is called Sol-laa (or its derivatives). Abraham, the people of Midyan, the Children of Israel and Jesus were non-Arabs, but the Reading quotes interaction with them on the basis of an equivalent word in their own language to Sol-laa. In 21:73, for example, God instructs Isaac and Jacob with the same word, ‘wa-iqama-Sol-laa-ti-wa-ie-ta-zakaa-ti[2]’ which means: uphold your commitments and keep them pure after their father Abraham.

None of the prophets before Muhammad were talking about ritual prayers when they uttered the equivalent of Sol-laa in their own language. Therefore, the word Sol-laa or its derivatives cannot be translated to mean ritual prayers. To think otherwise is to err on a very large scale contextually. The word Sol-laa and its derivatives appear in many verses in the Reading. Modern Arab ‘translations’ will have us believe that there are many different meanings for the same word in different verses.

This ambiguity has generated much confusion. As a result, the word Sol-laa revolves around the ritualistic prayer performed according to a timetable accompanied by ritualistic physical movements. It is presumptuous to think that God would enjoin on us something quite so mundane. 

The priests of the Arab religion will ask: So how can we pray if we depend on the Qur’an alone? This is absolutely beside the point. Was there ever any question that we should need more than the Reading?

Many religions around the world have in common the fact that their priests have the right to question their followers but the followers do not have the right to question the priests on religious matters.

If we ask the Christian priest why they say Jesus is God whereas the Bible says he was serving God who created him, the Christian priest will jump. Similarly, if we ask the priests of the Arab religion why they pray ritually five times a day when it is not specified in the Reading, they will likewise find themselves on the back foot.

This amounts to the beginning of an acknowledgement by the priests of the Arab religion (soon to be remedied by the use of other ‘authentic’ sources) that there is no ritual prayer in the Reading. The truth is their ritual prayer was not revealed to the Last Prophet in God’s prescribed way of life. We know because we read the Reading. Sol-laa as it appears in the Reading simply implies a person’s commitment to observe his or her obligations as prescribed in the Reading. Nowhere does the Reading state that humans must perform any ritual prayer to God.  This is a fact that Muslims need to bear in mind. 


[1] This word is erroneously pronounced as ‘Salaat’ by the followers of the Arab religion although the consonant of the root word is Sod Lam is found in 96:10 and 75:31, which is pronounced as ‘Sol-laa’. Muslims who are shackled by their religious masters are shocked when I used the word ‘Sol-laa’ instead of ‘Salaat’.

[2] Although this word is to be pronounced as zakaa the Arabs twist the meaning and also the pronunciation and call it zakat. For Sol-laa they say Salaat and for zakaa they say zakaat (misconstrued in both cases) Please see chapter six.

 


The Arab ritual prayer

These simplified instructions will enable anyone to complete the dance of the Arab prayer ritual. Born to a Muslim family, the author personally performed this ritual countless times throughout his life before he called it a day many years ago. I must remind the reader, it is vital that every utterance in the Arab prayer ritual be in Arabic. The English-speaking Muslims may not even say a simple phrase like, “Praise be to You my Lord” in English.

Here, is a summary of the basic procedure for those who have never performed an Arab prayer ritual:

  • First, wash out your mouth with water, blow your nose, wash your face, your hands, your forehead, your ears, your neck, and your legs and then speak to God in Arabic and tell Him you are going to ritually pray to Him.

  • Find a spot and make sure you face the stone idol in Mecca. If you are in Japan the direction is westwards, but if you are in Europe the direction is the eastwards, obviously.

  • Then, stand properly with the hands folded on your belly. Various sects have their own specific ways of placing the hands, and the tutored eye can tell a lot about your doctrine just by looking at the way you hold this position, though variations abound throughout the mosques of the world.

  • Then pronounce ‘Allah hu akbar’.1 The word akbar means bigger. So it is: ‘God is bigger’. (Interestingly, the phrase Allah hu akbar is not found anywhere in the Reading). Then recite some Arabic verses (which you may or may not comprehend).

The prayer starts with a recitation of a set of speech formulated2 by the religionists before beginning the compulsory recital of Al Fatiha (the first surah, consisting of seven verses). Typically, this will be followed by a short surah from toward the end of the Reading. Surahs 111, 112, 113 and 114 are particular favourites as they are very short and generally considered the minimum (along with Al Fatiha) that a Muslim should be expected to memorise3. The religionists say they are praying to God. Yet each of these last surahs begins with an instruction to the Prophet: ‘Qul!’ or ‘Say!’ followed by exactly what it was he was required to say. However these verses which begin with a direct instruction are habitually addressed to God in the Arab prayer ritual. For example:

Say!: He is God, the only one. The absolute God. He never begets, nor was He ever begotten. There is none equal to Him. (surah 111)

There are many verses in the Reading that start with an imperative addressing a second person commanding him to recite to a third person or persons. That is the nature of the Revelation. However, the religionists teach their followers to recite these orders back to God in their prayer ritual. In one of their favourite surahs for this purpose, they tell God:

Say!: O you disbelievers, I do not serve what you serve, nor are you serving what I am serving. I will never serve what you are serving, nor will you ever serve what I am serving. To you is your own way, and to me is my own way. (surah 109)

However, if they choose to recite surah 108 in their prayer, they will tell God:

We have given you many bounties. In appreciation, you shall serve your Lord and be charitable. Your enemy will henceforth be the loser. (surah 108)

Obviously, not all non-Arabs know what they are saying to God in their ritual prayers. Maybe there is some excuse. But even native Arabic-speaking Arabs including religionists and Arabic scholars say these things to God every day!

Having finished the liturgy of (frequently inappropriate) verses, you should raise both hands and say ‘allah-hu-akbar’ or ‘God is bigger’ again.

Then you bow forward for a few seconds before standing erect and calling out ‘God is bigger’ again. Then you prostrate – placing your forehead on the floor – and recite more Arabic words. Then you should sit up and then prostrate again before rising to the standing position. This procedure represents one unit of prayer. The number of units and whether what you say will be aloud or quiet will depend on a number of factors devised by the religionists such as time of day and ‘type’ of prayer. Generally, (although there are variations depending on whether you perform the ‘extra’ night prayers) a Muslim is required to bow seventeen times and prostrate thirty-four times in a twenty-four hour period.

At the end of any one particular set of units, you are to sit and send greetings to Prophet Abraham and Muhammad and their families (no need to wait for them to reply, however), then greet the ‘two angels sitting on both of your shoulders’ (again, no reply is expected).

Reading clearly says:

You cannot be heard by those in the graves. (35:22)

Yet, the followers of the Arab religion the world over are greeting only the dead prophet Muhammad and their families five times a day! We are not supposed to make any distinction between the prophets4: but Isaac, Jacob, Ishmael, Joseph, David, Solomon, Moses, Aaron, Zachariah, John (Yahya), and Jesus were somehow left out of this private club. How very rude.


1 Saying allah-hu-akbar is done during each body movement and in a group session is said by the man leading the exercise as a cue to tell the people when to move from one position to another.

2 The recitations differ from one sect to another. The opening passages of the prayer do not come from the Qur’an except when they utter part of 6:79, 6:161-162. Abraham and Muhammad uttered these verses to the people but the Arabs address them to God.

3 When people are willing to memorise without understanding it is a sign of their willingness to be shackled without thinking. If we train a parrot to say ‘good morning’, it will say good morning to people even during the night.

4As for those who believe in God and His messengers, they make no distinction among any of them. God will recompense them. God is Forgiver and Merciful. (4:152)

Arab religious laws

Beside ritual prayers and the ritual worship practices, the religionists who invented the religion also mandated religious laws that have nothing in common with God and His prophets.

God’s way has a benchmark here on earth: the Reading. He called His book the Criterion.1 It is a book among books, a criterion, a standard by which all else is measured. With this benchmark, one can decisively discern whether something is good or bad, true or false, sacred or profane, real or imaginary. Having given us a rule by which all can be measured, it is assumed that a person will use this God-given benchmark often. The Devil, of course, will try to make it inaccurate. He has already done this by obscuring the original intent and limits of the Criterion.

For example, in 2:224-242 we find eighteen verses, which outline amicable justice on the subject of marriage and divorce. They further illustrate the guidelines and methods for resolving marital disputes. These guidelines are self-explanatory and can be put into practice by anyone. In other words, God has directed His people to apply a behavioural etiquette that does not include priests or any religious authority whatever. Thus, there is no need for any new, independent body of lawmakers to formulate ‘Islamic’ religious laws on marriage and divorce.

The very existence of supplementary human laws to ‘augment’ the word of God is horrifyingly arrogant. It places the justice of People on the same level as the decrees of God.

Even in vernacular law, the essence of the law is paramount. We cannot go beyond the limits set. For example, if the minimum wage for a worker is ten dollars per day, we are free to pay him anything as long as it is not less than the stipulated sum. This concept is not man-made. Any individual who believes in God and the Hereafter is free to observe God’s guidelines as long as they do not exceed the limits prescribed by God. If they transgress the limits, God will judge them. If He be the Judge, it is redundant to have God’s guidance anointed with the title ‘Islamic’ law, religious law or ‘shari’ah’ law.

The purpose of Scripture is not to impose religious laws but to replace unjust human law. The Scripture is a law unto itself. It is complete in form and function.

We have sent our messengers with clear revelations and We sent down with them the Scripture as the measure (mizan) to spread justice among the people. (57:25)

Let us take this concept a little further along and consider the following:

  • Legislators and lawmakers of any civilised government (not including, naturally, the lawmakers of the Arab religion) will agree that no man or woman who commits adultery should be executed.

  • The same servants of Justice (except for the religionists and their cohorts and dupes) will agree a person is free to believe or disbelieve in God, and that he or she is free to change their belief anytime without being punished by priests (or anyone else) for their decision.

  • Similarly, the legislators (except the same people mentioned above) will agree that a divorced woman should not be deprived of her freedom and she should have reasonable provisions until she is able to find other alternatives or reconciliation.

These are just some instances of guidance which are humanely spelt out in the Reading. They are correct principles, which work together for the advancement and cohesion of society. Civilized countries have come to practice them after many years of experimentation and observation. They have come to implement them because they are fair and because they work. The Reading gives us a shortcut to a generative rule of law. The basis is not religion. The basis is Life. The basis is rooted in providing a plan for a way of life, designed to accommodate the human condition fairly and firmly. All prophets taught this.

The question arises: if the Arab lawmakers were so keen to ‘legalize’ the law of God, why did they not then legislate requirements for other equally important aspects of the Reading like civility, politeness, consideration, respect, empathy, patience, humility, charity on human welfare, temperance and mercy? Shouldn’t the Arab version of God’s law appear God-like in nature instead of tyrannical? The only conclusion any student of Islamic law can arrive at is that ‘Islamic’ laws originating from the religionists are not found in the Reading and are far from divinely inspired.

It is no wonder that the Arab world is in confusion and chaos. The religious laws of the Arab religion vary from country to country: Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Syria, Iraq, Iran, Sudan, Algeria, Oman, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Malaysia, Indonesia, and many other places have differing laws all claiming to be inspired by God. How is it that a divinely inspired law varies so much by geographical location? It can only mean that each location has a different ‘religious god’ at the helm. This has reduced Islamic ‘shari’ah law2 to a comical position. No two ‘Islamic’ countries have the same ‘Islamic’ laws. If it weren’t so sad, it would be hilarious.

Let us now examine what God intended before people started meddling.

Example one:

It is the incumbent duty of everyone to make a will for the benefit of their parents and children or their next of kin before death approaches any one of them (2:180-182)

This is a simple decree observed by most people with any common sense. It encourages planning and pre-meditation. It solves problems before they are created. It makes the bereavement less difficult on the grieving. It is just plain civil.

The religionists and their courts tell us that it is forbidden (or Haram) to make a will in the Arab religion. The religious priests or religious authority will decide what, how, and to whom a dead person’s assets should be distributed. And, of course, a certain portion of the assets may well be reserved for some invented religious purpose.

Example two:

Any person who believes in God, then disbelieves, and then believes and then disbelieves and persists in disbelieve will not be forgiven by God (4:137)

People are given the absolute right to believe or disbelieve in God. If they reject belief and persist in doing so, God will not pardon them in the Hereafter. That is all.

There is no compulsion in the deen. Truth is now distinguished from falsehood. Thus, those who reject idol-worship and believe in God have grasped the strongest bond that never breaks. God is hearer, omniscient. (2:256)

The people can exercise their right and freedom to accept or to reject God’s revelations3, yet He will not punish them in this world if they choose to reject His Scripture:

You can believe therein or disbelieve. (17:107)

The religionists, in their contorted wisdom, have declared that anyone who renounces the ‘religion’ must be sentenced to death. It is very much Jewish in nature.

Example three:

A person is expected to use his or her intellect and reason.

God will not guide those who defy their common sense (10:100)

Yet, somewhere along the line an adherent of the Arab religion declared:

Those who use their common sense will be burned in Hell. (Sahih Bukhari4)

Many of these ‘new’ decrees in the Arab religion are diametrically opposed to the wisdom of the Reading. How could the system have erred to such a degree? One supposes that religious centrism and insecurities have been the primary drivers for this movement. After all, only the Supremely Confident would have allowed people total freedom of choice. People, on the other hand, seek to impose control and likes to do so through laws. It is even better when that control is manifested in ‘religious’ garb which makes these laws incontestable.

God tells us that Sol-laa is the fulfilling of commitments through righteous deeds. The Arab religion tells us, however, it means doing the regimented prayers five times a day in the prescribed direction of their homeland where their god apparently lives. Of course, those wishing to commune with God must first consult with the Arab masters who have mastered the art of the prayer ‘procedures’, actions, precursors, etc. For the benefit of the more than five billion people on earth who would have no idea what the author is referring to, the Arab prayer ritual is outlined below.


1 According to the Chambers Encyclopaedia English Dictionary, the word ‘criterion’ means: a standard or principle on which to base a Judgement. The word furqan is used when Moses was given the Torah (2:53 & 21:48), and to Jesus in 3:4. The Quran is called the furqan or ‘criterion’ in 2:185 and 25:1. In the Arab religion the man-made ‘syari’ah’ is the ‘criterion’ not the Qur’an.

2 42:21 forbids instituting any religious laws. Every man has the full right and freedom to conduct his personal way of life. The law of Justice and matters of crimes and security of a state is to be formulated through consensus by the experts of each field, which can be amended to suit circumstances.

3 There must not be any court of law to deny a person’s right in matters of faith.

4 Bukhari’s collection of some several thousand of nonsensical ‘traditions’ are considered Sahih, that is ‘good and reliable’.