The corruptions

Here is a summary of the corruptions which have been practised against the sense of the Reading by Arab religionists to suit their own purposes:

  1. A’kiffin wa-roka’is-sujud in 2:125 and 22:26 was made to mean bowing and prostrating physically when, in fact, it signifies humble oneself consentingly to God’s sanctioned system.
  2. Sol-laa-ta wa-atu-zakaa is not ritual prayer and wealth tax. It means we are to uphold our commitments and keep them pure.
  3. Sol-laa does not refer to ritual prayers. Its meaning was corrupted to become rituals. The Reading encourages personal commitment through deeds.
  4. Thor-iffin is not walking around or Tawwaf around the stone idol in Mecca but the meaning is groups or throngs of people.
  5. A’kif-fun is not a retreat to a house or to a mosque, but to hold strongly to God’s system or bayta. Wa-antum a’kiffun fi-masaajid’ in 2:187 means and when you are devoted in the consented decrees.
  6. Bayta is not a physical house belonging to God..
  7. Masaajid are not buildings but the consented decrees.
  8. Masa-jidil-lah are not God’s mosques but the consented decrees prescribed by God in the Quran.
  9. Masjidil-Harami is not ‘sacred mosque’. It is the sanctions of the God’s consented decree prescribed in the Quran.
  10. Bayti-ya is not My house, but it is My system. Noah used this word to refer to his system of belief. God uses the term bayti-ka on everyone of us to signify that He removes us from our system to His system after manifesting the truth to us.
  11. Hurumun is not the pilgrim’s garb. The word in 5:1 was twisted to perpetuate the invented Haj pilgrimage of the Arab religion. The word Hurumun simply means restricted or forbidden.
  12. U’mrah is not a visit to the Arab land, but is to promote the deen according to God’s consented decrees or the mas-jidil-lah as prescribed in the Quran.
  13. Haj is not a yearly pilgrimage to Mecca. It is to take the challenge: (1) to the system (2) to deliver the message until it is accepted in society (3) to promote the sanctions of God’s decree and (4) in the path of God (see: 3:97, 2:196, 9:19 and 4:100).
  14. The accepted sense of many words from the Reading has been severely mutilated to suit the rituals of the man-made Arab religion. The worst distortion of God’s word is in 2:196. The perception of the meaning of almost all the words in that verse has been distorted. The verse gives a guideline of how and what a person should do when he or she takes the challenge to promote God’s guidance until it is made acceptable by the masses – but it was distorted to reflect as pilgrimage to suit only for men.

For the Muslims who believe the Reading is the word of God, their duty is to:

  1. Find the path to the System (bayta) and take up the challenge (Haj) to promote what has been sanctioned by God in the Reading to establish the peacefulness or the true Islam.
  2. Uphold commitments (Sol-laa), keep them pure (zakaa) according to God’s laws (sha’iral-lah) and to promote (ya’muru) His consented decrees prescribed in the Quran.
  3. Take the challenge (Haj) and promote (or i’mara-ta) the sanctions of the consented decree (masjidil-Harami) and strive (jahidu) against the idol-worshippers (mushrikeen) and the rejecters (wal-kafireen) who bow and prostrate to stones, rocks and wood (and in this case falsely attribute their practice to Islam).
  4. Not violate decrees or upset the harmony in the sanctioned system (baytal-Harami).
  5. Live according to the sanctions in the system and uphold their obligations.

As we look around us, religious system has been the most powerful tool in enslaving people’s mind; it instils fear, cultivates disorder, separating people, bound in hatred, myth and superstition – a condition which is in the temporal interests of a small ruling elite. Today, our civilisation is living in a deteriorating world and people have tried to solve the world’s ill in many ways at all levels – sadly they failed to look at the problems where it exists – in organised religion.

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Hajaa Ibrohim

In 2:258 is the story of a man who challenged Abraham. The phrase used is Hajaa ibrohim. It should be clear that this does not mean that he sent Abraham on a pilgrimage to Mecca.

Many Muslims who have completed their pilgrimage to the stone idol in Mecca append the word Haji to their name (e.g. Haji Sulaiman or Haji Raheemudin) – a habit which Arabs find highly amusing.

Alam-tara-ilal-lazi Hajaa Ibrohim fi-rob-bi-hi (2:258)

Have you not considered the man who challenged Abraham about his Lord with it? (2:258)

Hajaa ibrohim has the same fundamental root as Haji i’mara-ta mas-jidil-Harami in 9:19 which refers to the people who take the challenge to promote the sanctions in the consented decree.

This study highlights how the semantic distortions against the Reading by the religionists have had a very damaging effect, and how – as soon as they twist one word – a chain reaction occurs because they then have to change the meanings of other words from the same root word to support the deception. Haj – as we have seen – has not been left unscathed in this regard.

The Arabic in the Reading is easy and perfect. Let us briefly remind ourselves how the Qur’anic Arabic renders nouns denoting people relating to the root-word concepts.

  • The meaning of Sol-laa is commitment or obligation. A man who (singular) is committed is called a muSollan (2:125). If plural they are called muSollin (107:5).
  • The meaning of Islam is peacefulness. A man who is at peace is said to be a Muslim (2:131). If plural, muslimin for men and Muslimat for women.
  • The meaning of ihtada is to be truly guided. Many guided people are called muh-tadin (2:16)
  • The meaning of azan is to announce. A man who makes the announcement is called a muazzinun (7:44).

Similarly the meaning of the word Haj is challenge. People who take the challenge are called Hajii (9:19). People who are involved in the challenge are called the muHajiirin (9:100).

The challenge is Haj. In 3:97 God says take the challenge (Hajuu) to His System if we can find our way to it. In 2:196 Take the challenge (Ha-jaa) to promote (u’mro-ta) the guidance (hadya) to the people until it is made acceptable (mahilla). They are the rightful people to promote (ya’muru) God’s consented decree (mas-jidil-lah) (9:18) who take the challenge (Hajii) (9:19) by promoting (i’marata) the sanctions in the consented decree.

It is the duty upon mankind towards God to take the challenge (Hajuu) to the system (bayta) for those who can find their way. (3:97)

For those who are convinced about God and want to observe His prescribed way of life, they must take the challenge Hajuu to His system ‘if they can find the way’. This is the challenge or Haj only for those who are willing to accept the responsibility to strive in the path of God with their money and lives in promoting the sanctions in the consented decree. They have only one common enemy – organised religions. Consciously or not – religion is the greatest enemy to humanity and its doctrine can wipe out the mountains. Religious promoters corrupt the earth by enslaving peoples’ mind, body and soul and teach them separation and intolerance in the name of God. Religious leaders and the shackled followers are term as idol-worshippers. In the Reading, there is no instruction for us to wage war against anyone except the idol-worshippers. Thus the biggest challenge (Hajii Akhbar 9:3) for mankind is to disown the idol-worshippers with stern reminder that they can never escape from God for lying in the name of God.

People who are not involved with the challenge may live in this world peacefully as normal human beings. They can be architects, scientists, doctors, firemen, engineers, soldiers, students, taxi or truck drivers, traders, teachers, or other professions that can benefit society and whole of mankind – whilst observing their commitments in doing the good deeds and good works without associating God with anything. That is all what is required of us on this earth.

The religionists say Haj is a pilgrimage culminating in reverence around the area where they built a square house in Mecca. This is the extent of their distortion.

We are not to put on the Roman togas, shave our head, throw stones at some brick pillars, kiss a black granite stone, walk in semi-circles around another stone structure crying, “I have come God, I have come” and then walk away feeling satisfied that we have fulfilled our commitments. Rather, we are actively and consciously to take the challenge or the Haj to move ourselves closer to living a way of life (deen) that is sanctioned by God. That is Haj is about.

3:97 states: ‘manis-tha-tha’a ilaihi sabiilaan’ which means ‘whoever can find his way there’. If pilgrimage were indeed a religious ritual to the Ka’aba in today’s Mecca in Saudi Arabia, or even the Mecca of 500 years ago, there would be no mystery in finding our way there. Even 500 years ago, people knew where Mecca was. One simply had to get on a camel or horse (or a jumbo jet today) in order to reach it. Where is the difficulty in finding it?

But we cannot get to God’s system by jumping on a jumbo jet or riding on a camel. We must take the challenge to get there. It is a test of our commitment. We definitely cannot get there by shaving our head, wearing a toga, throwing some stones at a stone pillar like a child, kissing a piece of black granite or walking in circles around another stone pillar. If we insist on doing these things, we become religious morons doing something without using our common sense and without having any knowledge of the Reading. It is not difficult for humans to take the challenge Hajuu to God’s system and be devoted to His System or humbly consenting to His system. His system is not a religion. Period.

Islam or ‘peacefulness’ is the universal way of life that can be observed by any human on earth. It requires no institution or organization. In many cases there are wise men like Luqman who did not received any consented decree from God, but he was endowed with wisdom.

Each and every person is responsible for whatever he does during his lifetime. Each will be judged as an individual. We have the freedom to believe or disbelieve.

Haj means an intellectual challenge or a response to a challenge and it does not mean pilgrimage in any shape or form. Similarly, hijr does not mean what the religionists say. It is not primarily about emigration. Its core meanings are related to leaving (i.e. shunning or leaving off) and in this sense it is connected to the essence with that of the purpose of Haj.

Indeed those who believe and take the challenge (ha-jaa-ru) to struggle with the money and lives in the path of God as well as those who shelter and lend support they are protector of each other. But those who believe but have not taken the challenge (yu-ha-jee-ru) you owe them no obligation to lend support to them from anything until they take the challenge (yu-ha-jee-ru). But if they seek your assistance in the way of life (deen) it is therefore your duty to support them unless there is among you made an agreement with them. God sees whatever you do. (8:72)

Here the word ha-jaa-ru and yu-ha-jee-ru refers to two types of believers. Both are staying in the same area. Both words were erroneously translated as emigrating by the religionists. A person who strives in the path of God is not required to emigrate from his hometown. The evidence can be found in 3:195.

Their Lord responds to these by saying, “I never neglect to reward any worker among you, male or female; you are equal to each other. Those among you who take the challenge (ha-jaa-ru) and get banished from your homes, I will certainly redeem all their wrongdoings and admit them into gardens with flowing streams”. Such is the reward from God. God possesses the best reward. (3:195)

If ha-jaa-ru means emigrating, then there is no way they can be banished from their home. Clearly this word refers to the activities of striving in the cause of God by taking the challenge which is the ha-jaa-ru or to take the challenge in the path of God ha-jee-ru-fi-sa-bi-lil-lah.

Abraham, for example, settled in a new place – implying that those who wished to follow him would have to establish their commitment to the sanctioned system. He did not emigrate to another town or country to strive in the path of God.

Moses remained in Egypt until he moved away because of oppression. Moses and his people were banished for striving in the path of God.

Shuaib remained in Midyan and Jacob remained in the desert until his son summoned him to the city. They never moved to a new town to promote God’s deen.

Jonah tried to flee from his people but was severely dealt with.

In spite of rejection, Jesus did not move to another place. On the other hand, we have a key example (see 2:61) of the Children of Israel who – having physically forsaken Egypt – remained essentially steeped in the things which Egypt had to offer. Was theirs a state of migrating at this point? It would seem not.

The word ‘committed’ corrupted

In 2:125, the word muSolla is derived from the root Sol-laa with a prefix of mu represents Abraham as the doer in the singular.

The enemies of the Last Prophet, however, say the word ‘ibrohimi muSolla’ is a place of ritual prayer where Abraham stood to pray (and then somehow his footprints were miraculously appeared in a copper block at the same spot). We should note that there are three numbers in Arabic: singular, dual and plural. When the doer of Sol-laa is in the singular he is called muSollan, but when the doer is plural they are called muSollin. The word muSollin is also found in the Reading:

  • In 2:125 ibrohimi-muSol-laa informs us that a man by the name of Abraham was the doer of the Sol-laa. Abraham was called a muSollan.
  • In 107:5 (see below) the same word is used to indicate many people (plural) who are the doers of their Sol-laa. They are called the muSollin. This is the plural of muSollan.

The same method was used by the religionists in their shuffle of the word Sol-laa. They say one thing in one place and then something else in another place. The word muSollan (in the singular) appears only once in the Reading and it refers to this particular person who was made the ‘leader’ for mankind.

It seems – in their haste to ascribe meanings to words in order to shore up their religion – the religionists overlooked the fact that the same word is used in the plural at three other places in the Reading. We will look at all instances now:

Min-maqam-mi Ibrahima muSollan (singular) (2:125)

The status of Abraham, the committed.

Illaa muSollin (plural) (70:22)

Except those who are committed.

Lam-naku Minal muSollin (plural) (74:43)

We are not from among those who are committed.

Wai-lul Lil- muSollin (plural) al-lazi-nahum ala-Sol-laa-tihim saa-hun (107:5-6)

Woe for those who are committed but they are careless of their commitments.

The last verse refers to those who take their commitments in jest: woe to them!

No Arabic linguist would dare say muSollan is a place of ritual prayers; but the religionists insist the word refers a physical location. So in 2:125 they prolong the corruption by claiming that ibrohima muSollan is Abraham’s place of ritual prayer. There is a logical and grammatical contradiction here for which no priest or u’lema can provide any explanation.

MuSollan is nothing but the singular of an active participle who upholds the Sol-laa. MuSollin is the plural. This is simple Arabic.

An example: in 7:44 there is a proclaimer of an announcement. The word announce in Arabic is azan and the past tense is azzana. The person who proclaims or makes the announcement is called the Mu-Azzin.

Then it is announced (azzana) by the announcer (MuAzzin), “God’s curse has befallen the wicked.” (7:44)

Similarly, Abraham was the upholder of the commitment or Sol-laa and he is called a muSollan – committed man. Even the scholars who know the Arabic language were taken for a ride by the religionists. Are they not part of the conspiracy, then?

The worship of a stone house

The following chapters focus on the analysis of many Arabic words. These words will be written according to their vocalic sounds. Readers not familiar with Arabic are asked to bear with me. It is important to refer to these words because most of the time the enemies of God and His messengers will distort words, which seem to be similar and yet are not.

He is the one who revealed to you this Scripture with perfect verses as the essence of the book, and the rest are consistent. Those who are sick in the hearts are inclined to follow that which is not consistent with the intention to disparage and to interpret them. No one knows their interpretations except God. And those who are well founded in knowledge say, “We believe in all the revelations from our Lord.” No one will take heed except those who are intelligent. (3:7)

The essence of the Scripture is that the verses are perfect. Perfect means without defect. If we perceive any contradiction it is not the fault of the Book, but we have to sincerely admit that it is perhaps our lack of understanding or that our comprehension of the message is less than good.

Why do they not study the Reading carefully? If it were from other than God, they would have found many contradictions therein. (4:82)

In other words when God says, ‘You must not serve other than Me‘ it simply means that anyone who claims to have found a way to serve Him which contradicts His message must be in error. Arab or not. Likewise, if God says, ‘You must not associate anything with Me’ it means we cannot do something to the contrary and provide excuses to justify our action. That cannot be too difficult to understand. It is a simple black-and-white statement. No one would dream of answering the question, “Are you pregnant?” with an evasive: “Just a little bit.” Either you are or you are not.

In chapter three we saw how the religionists shuffle the word Sol-laa by giving it different meanings. They only end up contradicting themselves when they try to manipulate the same word elsewhere in the Reading. That is exactly why the verse says the contradictions are not from God but from other than Him.

Chapter 2:125 has been the singular misfortune of being the Arab religionists’ main target to twist God’s words to justify their Arab religion. I will prove by reference to the Reading that eight simple words in 2:125 have been corrupted by the enemies of God.

The word bayta is found twice. If we examine the word critically and compare it with other verses in the Reading we will discover why the religionists’ claim that this means a physical house – and the so-called Ka’aba in Mecca in particular – has no basis.

There are many words, which require examination in this one verse alone. Each has to be explained clearly. This chapter will discuss only bayta and bayti-ya. Other words in the same verse will be discussed in the next chapter.


Related posts:

Questions that the religionists cannot answer

The proponents of the ritual prayer can only pick five verses from the Reading on the basis of which – by quoting them out of context – they claim an imperative for the ritual prayer. However, they cannot quote any verse from the Reading to show the methods of the rituals, as they themselves concede.

Perhaps now it is time for them to answer some questions:

  • How do you pardon the idol-worshippers when they continue to remain as idol-worshippers even though they have performed the ritual prayer? (9:4-6)

  • How are idol-worshippers to perform the ritual prayer?

  • How did the Prophet lead the ritual prayers for the non-believers according to (your reading of) 4:101-102?

In-naal kafirin nakanu lakum ‘aduwun mubin, wa-izza konta fi-hem fa-aqom-ta lahum Sol-laa-ta (4:101-102)

Surely the disbelievers are your manifest enemy, And when you are in their midst you shall lead them in Sol-laa (ritual prayer?) (4:101-102)

  • How can the ritual prayer of the Prophet console people or make them happy? (9:103)

  • When you are in sudden disaster or facing sudden death, how can the two strangers who are to be witnesses (and who may not know anything about the Arab religion) perform the ritual prayer before swearing to God that they will be truthful? (5:106)

  • How did all the people of a town and those living in the surrounding areas preserve their ritual prayer (wa hum alaa Sol-laa-tihim haafizuun) as soon as they heard the message of the Reading (6:92)? It may have included non-believers, Christians or Jews.

  • Why is it that yuSollu means ritual prayer in 4:102 but in 33:56 it means honour and support?

  • Likewise, how does the word yuSollee in 3:39 turn into ritual prayer while in 33:43 it is said to mean honour?

  • Solluu in 33:56 and Sollee in 9:103 have come to mean honour and supplication. In 75: 31 and in 96:10 the word Sol-laa is said to mean ritual prayer. Why is that?

  • How do the birds in the sky and everything between the heavens and the earth (including frogs, termites and trees, for example) perform their ritual prayer? (24:41)

  • How could the ritual prayer (Sol-laa-tuka) of Shuaib in 11:87 have changed the economic system of the people?

  • Why are the same Sol-laa-waatee in 2:238 (‘guard your ‘Sol-laa-waatee’) and 9: 99 (the Messenger’s Sol-laa-waatee) understood differently?

  • Why are the same words Sol-laa-waa-tun in 2:157 (ulaa ika alaihim Sol-laa-waatun) and 22:40 (wa Sol-laa-waatun, wa masaa-jidu) stated with different meanings?

  • Is there anyone performing the ‘ritual prayer‘ by controversial talk and rebellion (Sol-laa-tuhum ‘indal baiti mukaan wa tashdiyyan) anywhere in the world? If so, where and how? (8:35)

  • How did the word muSollan (singular) evolve to mean location or place for performing ritual prayer in 2:125 when the same word muSollin (plural) is understood as the people who perform the ritual prayer in 107:4?

It is inappropriate for the word Sol-laa or any of the derivatives (generated from the same root word) to be rendered as a ritual act by people toward God. Its meanings relate to the commitments which link a human being to God through their deliberate deeds.

Sol-laa is the commitment to observe the prescribed covenants. This encompasses the whole of God’s commandments in the Reading to people. It covers obligations, relationships, agreements between people, a person’s obligations to own self, and matters of cleanliness and diet. It extends to promises, dealings, relationships, families, and parenting. There is nothing ‘religious’ about it.

Frequently asked questions

Proponents of ritual prayer are fond of saying that certain verses where this root verb appears prove the existence of ritual prayer. Their arguments tend to be like the following:

  1. What about 5:6 where you are supposed to do the ritual ablution (which they call wudu) before Sol-laa?

    Surely, that proves that ritual prayer is needed. Surah 5 is to be read from 1 through to 7. Verse 6 is about being hygienic. The first two verses talk about food. People should observe the harmony sanctioned by God in the system. Verse 3 has more details on food, and then it says, ‘Today the way of life (or the deen) is perfected’ after detailing unhygienic food. The fourth and the fifth verses also talk about food with additional decrees that Muslims can marry the people of the previous Scripture. That in itself should be an eye-opener.The subsequent verse says that we are upholding our commitments when we make ourselves clean. In verse 7 we are told to be appreciative of God’s blessing upon us and we should uphold the covenants He made with us from the time we say, ‘We hear and we obey’.Hygiene is part of our commitments. And if there is no water to wash ourselves, God has prescribed an alternative i.e. to use clean dry soil to clean our hands. The point is, we are obliged to be as clean as we can – and here the limits are described with provision for extreme circumstances.

    There is no such thing as the word ritual cleansing or wudu (this common term used by the majority of the Muslims is not to be found anywhere in the Reading). There is no ritual ablution. In 5:6 we are told it is good to wash ourselves up to the elbows, wash the face, and wipe our heads and feet. We must keep ourselves clean. This verse does not say that Sol-laa is a ritual prayer. The verse does not say after we ‘ritually’ clean up ourselves we must start praying ritually.

  2. What about 11:114 where we are told to uphold the Sol-laa at the ends of the day and parts of the night?

    It is a mistake to quote verses out of context. Here, 11:114 should be read from surah 11 verse 112 through to 115. The verse does not say the Sol-laa should be done at two ends of the day and parts of the night. The verse actually says through both ends of the day and parts of the night. The verse is rendered here in its full context:You shall uphold what was prescribed, and also those who repented with you, and not transgress. Indeed, He knows whatever your deeds are, watching. Do not be inclined to those who are wicked. That will make you suffer the Fire, and there is none for you except God as a protector, then you will not be helped. And uphold your commitments (aqimi-Sol-laa-ta) through the ends of the day and the parts of the night. Indeed the good deeds nullify the bad. That is the remembrance for those who want to remember. You shall be steadfast. God never fails to reward the righteous. (11:112-115)The verse clearly says the commitments are ongoing throughout the day and parts of the night. Verses 11:112-115 emphasise the importance of doing good deeds throughout the day and parts of the night by focusing oneself in routines according to what is taught from God’s prescribed decrees. It is a simple instruction.

  3. What about 24:58 where the Solatil fajri and Solatil ‘isha are mentioned?1

    This verse refers to the periods of undress when children must seek permission before entering their parents’ room – from the time the parents retreat to their rooms (Solatil ‘isha) until the next morning (Solatil-fajri). We continue to observe our commitments during our private time. The same verse requires the seeking of permission to enter the room when parents are resting at noon.The Solatil ‘isha and the Solatil-fajri are not the names attributed to any ritual prayers but they are the parents’ private time. Similarly, it is not right for parents to simply walk into their children’s room once they retreat to their rooms. The verse teaches family etiquette, and as part of the obligations we are to teach children to respect their parent’s privacy. There is no ritual prayer mentioned in the verse.

  4. What about 4:103 where God says the Sol-laa-ta are done at specified times?

    It is our duty to do certain deeds at specific times through the day from morning to dusk and also parts of the night, from the sinking of the sun at noon till the darkness of the night. That means 24/7. The verse says we are committed to do certain things at the specified times. We must do what we have to do when it is time and do it diligently.If we are traders we must maintain our commitments not cheat or earn by excessive profiteering. If a beggar or a poor man comes to us at nine in the morning, we should not tell him to come back at 1 o’clock. If our workers have worked for us we should not delay or postpone their wages. If we promise to see somebody at 3.00 p.m. then we should uphold that commitment to the man by meeting him at 3.00 p.m. sharp because God says, ‘They fulfil their promises when they make their promise’. Fulfilling our promises is part of the commitment.

  5. What about 17:110 when you are told to use a moderate tone in your Sol-laa-teka?

    First of all we must read from 17:105-111. In the context we see that 17:110 is about the manner in which we should publicly avow our commitments and call people to God. We are not to go around either with a loud speaker or by being so quiet no one hears us.In 17:110 specifically, the Prophet is asked to use a moderate tone when calling people to God.Say, Call upon God, or call upon the Most Compassionate. Whatever you call, to Him belong the most beautiful names. Neither avows your commitment publicly loudly or quietly, but seek a middle course. (17:110)


1 That is, they say the Morning Prayer and the night prayer. Strangely, the Qur’an mentions the word ‘Salatil-fajri‘ but the Muslims say ‘Salatil-Subhi‘.

How the religionists do the ‘Sol-laa shuffle’

Let us see how the translators are forced to jump from one meaning to another for the same word or the derivatives. I call this The Sol-laa Shuffle.

Form Occurs Explanation
Solaa 3 In 75:31 and 96:10 stated as ritual prayers
faSol-laa 1 In 87:15 & 108:2 stated as ritual prayers.
YuSol-laa 3 In 2:27, 13:21 and 13:25 stated as must tie or connect the relationship with God
Sol-lee 1 In 9:103 stated (with regard To the Prophet) as supplicated or said a prayer for the people, not ritual prayer
tuSol-lee 1 In 9:84 stated as ritual prayer (Do not pray over the hypocrites)
faSol-lee 1 In 108:2 stated ritually pray to your Lord, but in Arabic faSol-laa lirobbika means ‘uphold your commitments for Your Lord.’
yuSol-lee 2 In 3:39 and 33:43
(a) In 33:43 it is means God and the Angels ‘blessed’ the believers. Nothing about ritual prayers.
(b) But in 3:39 it is stated as Zachariah doing the ritual prayers.
Sol-lu 1 In 33:56 stated as the People must Solluu or honour the Prophet. Nothing about ritual prayers.
YuSol-lu 3 Once in 33:56 and twice in 4:102.
(a) In 33:56 stated as God and the angels blessed the Prophet for the word ‘yuSollu’.
(b) In 4:102 the same word is stated as ritual prayers.
YaSilu 5 In 4:90, 6:136 (2), 11:70, 11:81, 13:21 and 8:35 stated as people who connect a relationship with God.
muSollan (sing.) 1 In 2:125 stated as a place of worship, not person who performs ritual prayer.
muSolleen(plur.) 3 In 70:22, 74:43 and 107:4 not stated as places of worship but people who perform ritual prayers.
Sol-laa ta 46 No ritual methods in context.
Sol-laa tee 20 No ritual methods in context.
Sol-laa tu 1 In 62:10 stated as ritual prayers.
Sol-laa taka 1 In 9:103 stated as meaning the Prophet’s ritual prayer makes the people happy. The Reading clearly says that no burdened soul will bear the burden of another. So how can this be?
Sol-laa teka 1 In 17:110 stated as meaning perform your ritual prayer in a moderate tone. But today, the noon and evening prayers of the Arab religion are performed in silence.
Sol-laa tuka 1 In 11:87 stated as the prophet Shuaib’s ritual prayers (in the context of them being able to change the economic system).
Sol-laa tahu 1 24:41 is said by the Arab religion to mean that the birds of the air perform their ritual prayer. Think about that one for a moment…
Sol-laa tehim 5 6:92, 23:2, 70:23, 70:34 and 107:5 are stated with the sense: you can trust those people who perform the ritual prayer, and they also make others understand that the people who perform the ritual prayer will always fulfil their promises in 70:32-35. Experience tends to show otherwise.
Sol-laa tuhum 1 In 8:35 stated as meaning their ritual prayer is nothing but controversy and rebellion.
Solaa-waatee 3 9:99, 2:238 and 23:9.
In 9:99 stated as: their good deeds will take them closer to God and also the ‘Sol-laa-waatee’ (ritual prayer?) of The Prophet. Another illogical statement. If we give food to a hungry man how does that take us closer the Prophet’s ‘ritual prayer’?
In 2:238 stated as meaning we are supposed to safeguard our ‘ritual prayers’ Sol-laa-waatee.
In 23:9 stated as meaning, “They observe their ritual prayers (sola-waa-teehim).” Here the religionists and the u’lema say they can fulfil their promises by performing the ritual prayer, they also say they are trustworthy because they pray ritually. What do you think?
Solaa-waa-tun 2 2:157 and 22:40. 2:157 -were there any consistency – would need to be rendered thus: as ‘upon them shall be ritual prayers from their Lord’, whereas 22:40 renders the word as churches. Some Arabic experts say Sol-laa-waatun in this context means oratories. What in the world is an ‘oratory’ in this context?

This twisting of one root word in the Reading yields many differing definitions, some of which are totally unrelated to the root word. No Arab priest today can provide any logical explanation for this inconsistency. They just regurgitate the Sol-laa Shuffle as a knee-jerk reaction to any challenge on the subject.