Abraham did not know anything about Mecca

It is easy to prove false the claim of the religionists that Abraham was given the responsibility of building a house for God in Mecca. Firstly, there are many verses in the Reading to show Abraham and Ishmael had never been to Mecca (see chapter twelve). Secondly, if the house were the focal point for mankind as a place to serve God, then all the prophets subsequent to Abraham failed to fulfill their obligation to go there. Lastly – and most crushing of all – is the fact that the Supreme God does not need a house. The idea is ridiculous.

By definition, a house is a place where people live. However, the idea of God’s house came from the religionists after they had manipulated the following passage. According to them the meaning of the verse is:

We then designated the house for mankind as the place of assembly and security. Use the station of Abraham as a place of ritual prayer. We gave instructions to Abraham to clean My house with Ishmael for the people who encircle it, retreat in it and for those who bow and prostrate physically to it. (2:125)

We now need to break the verse down into parts and to show how it was manipulated to give validity to a tribal system of idolatry.

Firstly the religionists would have it that:

God showed Abraham the house.

In order to utilize this statement for their own purposes, the Arabs either built this house (or utilized an existing pagan temple, of which there were many) to complete the illusion. This they made the center for their re-vamped religion.

Having twisted the meaning of the word bayta, they then insisted that the word masha-batan as ‘a place of assembly‘. Masha-batan literally means ‘providence‘ an alien word to Arabs or their scholars. In the Reading ‘assemble’ or ‘assembly’ is derived from the root H SH R or Hashar. The root generates other verbs yah-sha-ru, uh-shur, hus-shira, yuh-sharu, hasher, or mah-shu-rotan and never as masha-batan. For meetings the Reading uses the word maja-lisi also not as masha-batan.

After giving a wrong notion to the word masha-batan they then manipulate the words maqaam and muSollan (which, in fact, indicate Abraham’s status and his commitments) to mean:

Use the station of Abraham as a place of ritual prayer.

To add credence to this assertion they carved a pair of footprints from a copper block and displayed it in front of the square stone idol. This, we are told, represents the station of Abraham. These footprints are taken as signifying a place of assembly for the performance of the ritual prayer. This level of idiocy and illusion is not even worthy of a bad Hollywood film.

Next:

For mankind to encircle, to devote to it, and to bow and prostrate to it.

So the people follow: they bow, prostrate, and encircle the stone box. Their rituals do not help them see God because the huge door to ‘His house’ remains closed. The religionists call the square stone house baytul-lah or ‘God’s house’.

It is perplexing to note that it has a door that the occupant never opens or closes. If the case is that God does not use doors, then why is there one? This can either mean He has never left His house, or it could mean He is not there. But let’s suppose the premise were true for a moment: God lives in a glorified porta-cabin. Shouldn’t the bounds of decency dictate that a house of God should be built for every mosque in the world, preferably from imported Arabian rock?

This is how the religionists fooled the people into worshipping idols made of rocks, granite, wood, copper, brass, black cloth and Arabic calligraphy. They teach the people to cry loudly, ‘O God here I come, O God here I come’ as though God were hard of hearing, focusing their full devotion to the idol resembling a house in the centre of their mosque. God has already told us that He hears what is in our hearts. These are nothing more than comical pagan rituals. The impact of manipulating one verse has distorted the whole concept of serving the One God as dictated in the Reading.

Somehow, millions feel a great exhilaration at performing this procedure. Yet, there are also thousands who do ask themselves privately ‘Why are we doing all this’? Yet they dare not abandon this practice. They will find that the answer to that question will elude them for as long as they put their trust in the religionists instead of God.

When we read the passage from 2:125 according to the intended message it says:

And when We designated the system as providence (bayta-masha-batan) for mankind and security. Take (learn) from the status (maqam) of Abraham who was committed(mu-Sol-lan). We contracted Abraham and Ishmael to cleanse My system (bayti-ya), for throngs of people (thor-iffin), those who are devoted (a’kiffin) to it, and those who humble themselves consentingly. (wa-ruku’is-sujud).

The disillusioned religionists changed the meaning of eight words from this one verse alone to denigrate Abraham – the chosen man – who was supposed to lead all the people on earth to God’s system. Translators are forced to accede to the erroneous application of these words although just two verses – 2:125 and 22:26 – form the entire supposed Qur’anic basis for this whole category of manipulated lunacy. The net result from the distortion is that millions of people believe that Mecca is the centre for the Islamic world:

  • The ‘system’ (bayta) is centred around a square shaped stone made from the mountain rocks standing in the centre of a mosque in Mecca, similar to stone idols erected in many of the temples around the world.
  • The ‘providence’ (masha-batan) became a place of assembly. So the people from all over the world assemble in Mecca.
  • The ‘status of Abraham’ (maqami-ibrohim) is a smaller idol in the form of a pair of footprints in a copper block mounted in a cage some ten metres from the door of the stone cube.
  • The ‘committed man’ (muSollan) is a place of worship. The stone idol is the focus.
  • The ‘throngs of people’ (Tho-iffin) is the religious rite of walking around the stone idol seven times in an anti-clockwise direction.
  • To ‘devote to’ (a’kiffin) means visit and pay homage to the stone cube.
  • To ‘humble themselves by consent’ (roka’is-sujud) is a series of choreographed movements of bowing and prostrating to the stone cube.

The religionists say that according to 2:125, God showed Abraham the house. They then advance two verses ahead to say Abraham and Ishmael built the house of God. Nobody notices this simple fraud. The question that begs to be answered is: how did God show a house to Abraham in 2:125 and ordered him to cleanse it and then, later (in 2:127), make him raise the foundation of the said house? With this level of gullibility being requisite for membership of the Arab idolatry club, is it any wonder the ‘Muslims’ are in such a poor state in the world?

This is, of course, yet more Arab trickery. In fact, 2:127 means: Abraham elevated the foundation from the system, but the religionists twisted it to mean Abraham raised the foundation of the house!

They have eliminated the word min al (‘from the’) appended to the word bayti completely, which changes the whole context of the passage. To illustrate, we will break 2:127 down to its component parts:

wa-iz       : and when 
yarfa-'u    : established
Ibrohimul   : Abraham
qo-wa'ida   : the foundation
minal-bayti : from the system
wa-ismail   : with Ishmael

Literally, it says: ‘And when Abraham established the foundations from the system with Ishmael’. This is more consistent with the context when the subject is read from 2:124. Even if the religionists insist that the word bayti means ‘the house’, Abraham could not be raising the foundation of a house which was already there. The word minal simply means from the. When it is prefixed to the word bayti it means from the bayti which means from the system.

A ‘system’ is a way of working, organising or doing something in which you follow a fixed plan or a set of rules. For example, if a situation or activity has a system, it has a sense of orderliness or good organisation. People sometimes talk about a system to refer to the government or administration of a state. When they think that it is too strong and has too many rules and regulations they oppose the system. Those who observe or uphold the system are committed to live in an orderly way within the prescribed rules of the system.

In other words, they live ‘by the system‘ or in Arabic ‘inda bayti‘ which is exactly what Abraham utters in 14:37.1

The religionists somehow wanted us to believe that the word inda bayti-ka means near Your house. To follow this reading to its logical conclusion, all the people of the world should live near God’s house. Just try to group the entire Arab race from Morocco, Algeria, Syria, Libya, Yemen, Palestine, Jordan, Iraq, Kuwait, Oman, United Arab Emirates and Saudi together in one place for one week and see what happens! If one were to add the Shiite population, the fireworks would really start to fly. There would be no need for the Americans to invade any more Arab soil – they could just walk in and take it because there would be no one left alive to oppose them!

The religionists are ignorant of what God says about the settlement of human beings on the earth:

O My servants who believed! My earth is spacious. Therefore, serve Me alone. (29:56)

When read as one subject, 2:124-127 give the meaning that Abraham and his son Ishmael were committed to God’s system. Both of them established the foundation of their commitments from a System – not from a house made of rocks in Mecca or anywhere else. As a matter of fact, neither the father nor son had any knowledge about a square stone structure attributed to God. It is just a figment of the primitive Arabs’ wild imagination. The message conveyed by these verses is, in fact, that Abraham and Ishmael were the first to establish the foundation from God’s system.

Let us see how the Reading uses the word Bayta to refer to it as the providence in His system for mankind. In some cases, the system works according to what we do with our work.


1 Abraham said, “My Lord I have settled my progeny in this barren valley according to the sanctions of your system. Our Lord, this is to let them observe their commitments. Therefore, make throngs of people incline to it, and provide them with fruits that they may be appreciative.” This is a repetition of Abraham’s request in 2:126: “My Lord, make this a peaceful land, and provide its people with fruits; provide for those who believe in God and the Last Day”. God replied, “I will also provide for the disbelievers. I will let them enjoy for a while, then commit them to retribution of Hell, and a miserable destiny.”

Advertisements

Questions that the religionists cannot answer

The proponents of the ritual prayer can only pick five verses from the Reading on the basis of which – by quoting them out of context – they claim an imperative for the ritual prayer. However, they cannot quote any verse from the Reading to show the methods of the rituals, as they themselves concede.

Perhaps now it is time for them to answer some questions:

  • How do you pardon the idol-worshippers when they continue to remain as idol-worshippers even though they have performed the ritual prayer? (9:4-6)

  • How are idol-worshippers to perform the ritual prayer?

  • How did the Prophet lead the ritual prayers for the non-believers according to (your reading of) 4:101-102?

In-naal kafirin nakanu lakum ‘aduwun mubin, wa-izza konta fi-hem fa-aqom-ta lahum Sol-laa-ta (4:101-102)

Surely the disbelievers are your manifest enemy, And when you are in their midst you shall lead them in Sol-laa (ritual prayer?) (4:101-102)

  • How can the ritual prayer of the Prophet console people or make them happy? (9:103)

  • When you are in sudden disaster or facing sudden death, how can the two strangers who are to be witnesses (and who may not know anything about the Arab religion) perform the ritual prayer before swearing to God that they will be truthful? (5:106)

  • How did all the people of a town and those living in the surrounding areas preserve their ritual prayer (wa hum alaa Sol-laa-tihim haafizuun) as soon as they heard the message of the Reading (6:92)? It may have included non-believers, Christians or Jews.

  • Why is it that yuSollu means ritual prayer in 4:102 but in 33:56 it means honour and support?

  • Likewise, how does the word yuSollee in 3:39 turn into ritual prayer while in 33:43 it is said to mean honour?

  • Solluu in 33:56 and Sollee in 9:103 have come to mean honour and supplication. In 75: 31 and in 96:10 the word Sol-laa is said to mean ritual prayer. Why is that?

  • How do the birds in the sky and everything between the heavens and the earth (including frogs, termites and trees, for example) perform their ritual prayer? (24:41)

  • How could the ritual prayer (Sol-laa-tuka) of Shuaib in 11:87 have changed the economic system of the people?

  • Why are the same Sol-laa-waatee in 2:238 (‘guard your ‘Sol-laa-waatee’) and 9: 99 (the Messenger’s Sol-laa-waatee) understood differently?

  • Why are the same words Sol-laa-waa-tun in 2:157 (ulaa ika alaihim Sol-laa-waatun) and 22:40 (wa Sol-laa-waatun, wa masaa-jidu) stated with different meanings?

  • Is there anyone performing the ‘ritual prayer‘ by controversial talk and rebellion (Sol-laa-tuhum ‘indal baiti mukaan wa tashdiyyan) anywhere in the world? If so, where and how? (8:35)

  • How did the word muSollan (singular) evolve to mean location or place for performing ritual prayer in 2:125 when the same word muSollin (plural) is understood as the people who perform the ritual prayer in 107:4?

It is inappropriate for the word Sol-laa or any of the derivatives (generated from the same root word) to be rendered as a ritual act by people toward God. Its meanings relate to the commitments which link a human being to God through their deliberate deeds.

Sol-laa is the commitment to observe the prescribed covenants. This encompasses the whole of God’s commandments in the Reading to people. It covers obligations, relationships, agreements between people, a person’s obligations to own self, and matters of cleanliness and diet. It extends to promises, dealings, relationships, families, and parenting. There is nothing ‘religious’ about it.

Frequently asked questions

Proponents of ritual prayer are fond of saying that certain verses where this root verb appears prove the existence of ritual prayer. Their arguments tend to be like the following:

  1. What about 5:6 where you are supposed to do the ritual ablution (which they call wudu) before Sol-laa?

    Surely, that proves that ritual prayer is needed. Surah 5 is to be read from 1 through to 7. Verse 6 is about being hygienic. The first two verses talk about food. People should observe the harmony sanctioned by God in the system. Verse 3 has more details on food, and then it says, ‘Today the way of life (or the deen) is perfected’ after detailing unhygienic food. The fourth and the fifth verses also talk about food with additional decrees that Muslims can marry the people of the previous Scripture. That in itself should be an eye-opener.The subsequent verse says that we are upholding our commitments when we make ourselves clean. In verse 7 we are told to be appreciative of God’s blessing upon us and we should uphold the covenants He made with us from the time we say, ‘We hear and we obey’.Hygiene is part of our commitments. And if there is no water to wash ourselves, God has prescribed an alternative i.e. to use clean dry soil to clean our hands. The point is, we are obliged to be as clean as we can – and here the limits are described with provision for extreme circumstances.

    There is no such thing as the word ritual cleansing or wudu (this common term used by the majority of the Muslims is not to be found anywhere in the Reading). There is no ritual ablution. In 5:6 we are told it is good to wash ourselves up to the elbows, wash the face, and wipe our heads and feet. We must keep ourselves clean. This verse does not say that Sol-laa is a ritual prayer. The verse does not say after we ‘ritually’ clean up ourselves we must start praying ritually.

  2. What about 11:114 where we are told to uphold the Sol-laa at the ends of the day and parts of the night?

    It is a mistake to quote verses out of context. Here, 11:114 should be read from surah 11 verse 112 through to 115. The verse does not say the Sol-laa should be done at two ends of the day and parts of the night. The verse actually says through both ends of the day and parts of the night. The verse is rendered here in its full context:You shall uphold what was prescribed, and also those who repented with you, and not transgress. Indeed, He knows whatever your deeds are, watching. Do not be inclined to those who are wicked. That will make you suffer the Fire, and there is none for you except God as a protector, then you will not be helped. And uphold your commitments (aqimi-Sol-laa-ta) through the ends of the day and the parts of the night. Indeed the good deeds nullify the bad. That is the remembrance for those who want to remember. You shall be steadfast. God never fails to reward the righteous. (11:112-115)The verse clearly says the commitments are ongoing throughout the day and parts of the night. Verses 11:112-115 emphasise the importance of doing good deeds throughout the day and parts of the night by focusing oneself in routines according to what is taught from God’s prescribed decrees. It is a simple instruction.

  3. What about 24:58 where the Solatil fajri and Solatil ‘isha are mentioned?1

    This verse refers to the periods of undress when children must seek permission before entering their parents’ room – from the time the parents retreat to their rooms (Solatil ‘isha) until the next morning (Solatil-fajri). We continue to observe our commitments during our private time. The same verse requires the seeking of permission to enter the room when parents are resting at noon.The Solatil ‘isha and the Solatil-fajri are not the names attributed to any ritual prayers but they are the parents’ private time. Similarly, it is not right for parents to simply walk into their children’s room once they retreat to their rooms. The verse teaches family etiquette, and as part of the obligations we are to teach children to respect their parent’s privacy. There is no ritual prayer mentioned in the verse.

  4. What about 4:103 where God says the Sol-laa-ta are done at specified times?

    It is our duty to do certain deeds at specific times through the day from morning to dusk and also parts of the night, from the sinking of the sun at noon till the darkness of the night. That means 24/7. The verse says we are committed to do certain things at the specified times. We must do what we have to do when it is time and do it diligently.If we are traders we must maintain our commitments not cheat or earn by excessive profiteering. If a beggar or a poor man comes to us at nine in the morning, we should not tell him to come back at 1 o’clock. If our workers have worked for us we should not delay or postpone their wages. If we promise to see somebody at 3.00 p.m. then we should uphold that commitment to the man by meeting him at 3.00 p.m. sharp because God says, ‘They fulfil their promises when they make their promise’. Fulfilling our promises is part of the commitment.

  5. What about 17:110 when you are told to use a moderate tone in your Sol-laa-teka?

    First of all we must read from 17:105-111. In the context we see that 17:110 is about the manner in which we should publicly avow our commitments and call people to God. We are not to go around either with a loud speaker or by being so quiet no one hears us.In 17:110 specifically, the Prophet is asked to use a moderate tone when calling people to God.Say, Call upon God, or call upon the Most Compassionate. Whatever you call, to Him belong the most beautiful names. Neither avows your commitment publicly loudly or quietly, but seek a middle course. (17:110)


1 That is, they say the Morning Prayer and the night prayer. Strangely, the Qur’an mentions the word ‘Salatil-fajri‘ but the Muslims say ‘Salatil-Subhi‘.

Ritual prayer is not in the Qur’an

God did not prescribe a ritual prayer to the Last Prophet or to any of the prophets before him.

The Reading has 114 chapters with 6348 numbered verses. No verse tells the people: you must perform a ritual prayer to God.

  • A ritual prayer is an act of worship. God never tells any of His servants to worship Him.

  • The revelation to the Last Prophet is not a new revelation from God.

  • It is not about religion or worship of God.

  • No priest of the Arab religion has ever said that the details of their ritual prayer can be found in the Reading. Their position is that seeking to obey the Reading alone is a non-starter since one cannot pray five times a day based on the Reading alone since it neither makes such a demand nor gives details of how this should be done. This is the testimony of the Arab priests themselves. They are very proud of their bowing and prostrating to the stone idol every day. They are very proud of the invented religion they promote.

Sol-laa is about doing deeds

Everything that a person does should be for God. We are not asked to perform any rituals or to pray to Him or to worship Him. All that is enjoined upon us is to believe in God, be sincere in serving Him by upholding our commitments and do good works. Ritual prayers and worship are the pagans’ shortcut to give idol-worshippers a sense of satisfaction that they have discharged their obligations to God when what is really required of them is that they discharge their Sol-laa amongst fellow humans and themselves.

According to the Reading, the main essence of the message revealed to Abraham and Moses is:

No burdened soul will bear the burden of another1, and every person is responsible for what he or she does. For whatever things that they do, it will be witnessed, and they will be fully repaid. (53:36-41)

In other words, each minute thought and deed is taken into account and recorded. God is recording all the deeds (and not the regimented mutterings) of His servants.

Since We created the human being, We are fully aware of his innermost thoughts. We are closer to him than his jugular vain. The two energies at right and left are recording all his deeds. Not a single utterance does he utter without a vigilant watcher. (50:16-18)

The majority of people do not believe God is omnipresent and that He can be with every human all the time, twenty-four hours a day. However, He knows every single thing a person does, even his innermost thoughts. No one person can hide anything from the Supreme Being. Everything is recorded. In the Hereafter, they are told to read their own record of what they have done to themselves.

You will see every congregation humbled. Every congregation will be invited to view its own record. Today you will be paid for your deeds. This is the record pronouncing the truth about you. Indeed, We have recorded all your deeds. (45:28-29)

Ritual prayer, unfortunately for those who put their faith in it, is not in the category of good deeds. What it is, is a form of religious worship, which goes against the essence of God’s revelations.

It is absurd to imagine a world where regimented prayers have moral precedence over good deeds. Besides, one can look around the world and see many places where people regularly perform ritual prayers and where serious crimes abound: rape, sexual abuse, cheating, stealing and corruption. These people ignore the priorities:

You shall uphold what was prescribed, and also those who repented with you, and not transgress. Indeed, He knows whatever your deeds are, watching. Do not be inclined to those who are wicked – they will make you suffer the Fire, and there is none for you except God as a protector. Then you will not be helped. And uphold your commitments (aqimi-Sol-laa-ta) through the ends of the day and the parts from the night. Indeed the good deeds nullify the bad. That is the remembrance for those who want to remember. You shall be steadfast. God never fails to reward the righteous. (11:112-114)

The verse clearly says we are to uphold what has been prescribed, and not transgress. God is recording all deeds. People must fulfil their commitment to do righteous deeds through the ends of the day and parts of the night. The concept is simple. Good deeds will nullify the bad and this is one way to remember God. Deeds can never be fulfilled through a fixed number of ritual prayers. If the concept of deen is correctly understood, it is clear to the devout Muslim that it is incumbent upon him to commit to these instructions, uphold and observe them. A simple definition of righteous deeds is clearly prescribed in the Reading and it does not include the act of worship or the performance of religious rituals.

Righteousness is not the turning of your faces towards the east or the west. But righteousness is to believe in God, the Hereafter, the energies, the Scripture and the prophets. And to donate of one’s wealth despite one’s love thereof to relatives, the orphans, the needy, those who are in hardship, to beggars, and to free mental enslavement by upholding the commitments and keeping them pure. And to keep the promises that are made, and to remain steadfast in the face of adversity, hardship, and war. These are truthful, these are righteous. (2:177)

The problem arises when a person’s mind is pre-conditioned to believe that Sol-laa means ritual prayer. Thus, righteous deeds are totally ignored. One so conditioned often insists that Sol-laa does mean ritual prayer, although a contextual study of the subject demonstrates that such a position does not make any sense.

Surah 107 is a very short chapter with only seven verses the name of which is Charity. A person who commits himself to the prescribed deen should not neglect his commitment to do charity and good deeds as a way of life.

Do you not notice those who are lying with the deen? They neglect the orphans. They do not advocate the feeding of the poor. Therefore curses be on those who are obliged, while heedless of their commitments. They only show off, and they are averse to charity. (107:1-7)

The religionists and the u’lema believe that God is cursing2 the people who pray ritually. They then teach their values to others who will listen without question – just as they did. Compare this rendition with that sanctioned by the religionists’ twisting culture:

Do you know who the rejecters of faith are? They neglect the orphans. They do not advocate the feeding of the poor. Therefore a curse be on those who pray ritually, while heedless of their ritual prayers. They only show off. And they are averse to charity. (107:1-7)

All seven verses are interrelated: taking care of the orphans, feeding the poor and carrying out charity work can only be fulfilled by the deeds of a committed person. The religionists say God is cursing those who pray whilst heedless of their prayer. They encourage their followers to pray ritually in order to solve the problem of the orphans, the poor and in lieu of charitable work. Instead of committing themselves individually and collectively to taking care of orphans, the poor and to doing charity from their own earnings, the Arabs trained their priests in the Arab religion to become income generators. They take illegal collections from the people by corrupting the word zakaa in the Reading to mean religious tithes.3 The Reading spells out other examples of good deeds to be observed by those who are committed to the prescribed way of life from God:

Successful indeed are the believers, who are upright in their commitments (Sol-laa-ti-hem) those who avoid vain talk, those who keep it pure, they guard their chastity except with their wives, and with those who rightfully belong to them do they have sex without being blamed. (23:1-6)

They are trustworthy when it comes to deposits entrusted to them, or the promises they make, and they constantly uphold their obligations (Solawa-ti-hem) (23:8-9)

In this verse it clearly says that those who avoid vain talk, guard their chastity and commit themselves to these values as a way of life are the successful believers. Additionally, they uphold their obligations diligently in fulfilling what they have promised and they are trustworthy when it comes to deposits entrusted to them. In other words, the Reading emphasises sincerity and honesty through deeds – not through ritual prayer. Unfortunately, we seldom see these good values in the Arab religion. Be that as it may, each time the word Sol-laa or the derivatives from this root word appears in the Reading, it appears in the context of good deeds that people are encouraged to uphold.

A further example:

They fulfil their promises to God and they do not violate their covenant. They linked (ya-Siluu) with it what had been commanded so that it binds (ai-yu-Sol-laa) as they are concerned about their Lord and they fear the dreadful reckoning and they steadfastly persevere in seeking their Lord’s grace. They uphold the commitments (Sol-laa-ta) and they give to charity from Our provisions to them secretly and publicly. They counter evil with good. They have deserved the ultimate abode. (13:21-22)

Here the two letter root Sod Lam signifies the fundamental meaning of ‘link’ for the word ya-Siluu whereas ai-yu-Sol-laa denotes the ‘binding’ and Sol-laa-ta is the proactive ‘commitment’. A person upholds his covenant with God by committing himself in doing the deeds that binds him. The meaning of ‘aqor-mus-Sol-laa-ta’ in this context is to ‘uphold the commitment’ for the covenant. It is ridiculous to assume that we uphold our covenant with God just through ritual prayers everyday.

In 23:1-9 quoted earlier the religionists has deliberately corrupted the meaning of the words ‘Sol-laa-ti’ and ‘Solawa-ti’ in these verses to mean ‘ritual prayer’. They trained their blind followers to ignore the context of the subject completely. Instead, they encourage their followers to concentrate on ritual prayers.


1 This is the fundamental concept of God’s orderly way of life sanctioned to all prophets. Unfortunately Rabbis, pope, priests, monks and mullahs say they can cleanse people’s soul. Only God can cleanse people including the freaks in religious garbs. In 33:15 it says, “No soul will bear the burden of another, when a burdened soul implores for help, nothing can be unloaded, not even by a close relative. So, what are these religious morons doing in our life?

2 This is the most ridiculous way of thinking – obviously not to the priests of the Arab religion.

3 See chapter six.

The Arab ritual prayer

These simplified instructions will enable anyone to complete the dance of the Arab prayer ritual. Born to a Muslim family, the author personally performed this ritual countless times throughout his life before he called it a day many years ago. I must remind the reader, it is vital that every utterance in the Arab prayer ritual be in Arabic. The English-speaking Muslims may not even say a simple phrase like, “Praise be to You my Lord” in English.

Here, is a summary of the basic procedure for those who have never performed an Arab prayer ritual:

  • First, wash out your mouth with water, blow your nose, wash your face, your hands, your forehead, your ears, your neck, and your legs and then speak to God in Arabic and tell Him you are going to ritually pray to Him.

  • Find a spot and make sure you face the stone idol in Mecca. If you are in Japan the direction is westwards, but if you are in Europe the direction is the eastwards, obviously.

  • Then, stand properly with the hands folded on your belly. Various sects have their own specific ways of placing the hands, and the tutored eye can tell a lot about your doctrine just by looking at the way you hold this position, though variations abound throughout the mosques of the world.

  • Then pronounce ‘Allah hu akbar’.1 The word akbar means bigger. So it is: ‘God is bigger’. (Interestingly, the phrase Allah hu akbar is not found anywhere in the Reading). Then recite some Arabic verses (which you may or may not comprehend).

The prayer starts with a recitation of a set of speech formulated2 by the religionists before beginning the compulsory recital of Al Fatiha (the first surah, consisting of seven verses). Typically, this will be followed by a short surah from toward the end of the Reading. Surahs 111, 112, 113 and 114 are particular favourites as they are very short and generally considered the minimum (along with Al Fatiha) that a Muslim should be expected to memorise3. The religionists say they are praying to God. Yet each of these last surahs begins with an instruction to the Prophet: ‘Qul!’ or ‘Say!’ followed by exactly what it was he was required to say. However these verses which begin with a direct instruction are habitually addressed to God in the Arab prayer ritual. For example:

Say!: He is God, the only one. The absolute God. He never begets, nor was He ever begotten. There is none equal to Him. (surah 111)

There are many verses in the Reading that start with an imperative addressing a second person commanding him to recite to a third person or persons. That is the nature of the Revelation. However, the religionists teach their followers to recite these orders back to God in their prayer ritual. In one of their favourite surahs for this purpose, they tell God:

Say!: O you disbelievers, I do not serve what you serve, nor are you serving what I am serving. I will never serve what you are serving, nor will you ever serve what I am serving. To you is your own way, and to me is my own way. (surah 109)

However, if they choose to recite surah 108 in their prayer, they will tell God:

We have given you many bounties. In appreciation, you shall serve your Lord and be charitable. Your enemy will henceforth be the loser. (surah 108)

Obviously, not all non-Arabs know what they are saying to God in their ritual prayers. Maybe there is some excuse. But even native Arabic-speaking Arabs including religionists and Arabic scholars say these things to God every day!

Having finished the liturgy of (frequently inappropriate) verses, you should raise both hands and say ‘allah-hu-akbar’ or ‘God is bigger’ again.

Then you bow forward for a few seconds before standing erect and calling out ‘God is bigger’ again. Then you prostrate – placing your forehead on the floor – and recite more Arabic words. Then you should sit up and then prostrate again before rising to the standing position. This procedure represents one unit of prayer. The number of units and whether what you say will be aloud or quiet will depend on a number of factors devised by the religionists such as time of day and ‘type’ of prayer. Generally, (although there are variations depending on whether you perform the ‘extra’ night prayers) a Muslim is required to bow seventeen times and prostrate thirty-four times in a twenty-four hour period.

At the end of any one particular set of units, you are to sit and send greetings to Prophet Abraham and Muhammad and their families (no need to wait for them to reply, however), then greet the ‘two angels sitting on both of your shoulders’ (again, no reply is expected).

Reading clearly says:

You cannot be heard by those in the graves. (35:22)

Yet, the followers of the Arab religion the world over are greeting only the dead prophet Muhammad and their families five times a day! We are not supposed to make any distinction between the prophets4: but Isaac, Jacob, Ishmael, Joseph, David, Solomon, Moses, Aaron, Zachariah, John (Yahya), and Jesus were somehow left out of this private club. How very rude.


1 Saying allah-hu-akbar is done during each body movement and in a group session is said by the man leading the exercise as a cue to tell the people when to move from one position to another.

2 The recitations differ from one sect to another. The opening passages of the prayer do not come from the Qur’an except when they utter part of 6:79, 6:161-162. Abraham and Muhammad uttered these verses to the people but the Arabs address them to God.

3 When people are willing to memorise without understanding it is a sign of their willingness to be shackled without thinking. If we train a parrot to say ‘good morning’, it will say good morning to people even during the night.

4As for those who believe in God and His messengers, they make no distinction among any of them. God will recompense them. God is Forgiver and Merciful. (4:152)

Serve God through commitments

Again, this is a frightening simple concept. We are encouraged to remind ourselves from the teachings of the Reading:

My commitments, my sacrifices, my life and my death are for God, Lord of the Universe. He has no partner. These are the commandments given to me and I am among the first of those at peace. (6:162-163)

We commit ourselves to everything with sincerity in our personal life including to our job, parents, spouse, children, and associates to enjoy the love, peace and harmony within ourselves for our own good and also for God. It needs self-sacrifice. The Reading teaches a way of life that espouses self-sacrifice for the benefit of all those around us. People are repulsive in committing themselves to the fundamental values prescribed by God in His deen. They are not willing to sacrifice ego, greed and arrogance by observing their obligations to do good deeds.

The Reading teaches these good values, but religionists insist the opposite. When we are confronted with those who dispute this simple concept, we are encouraged to tell them:

Shall I seek other than God as a Lord when He is the Lord of everything in existence? Whatever anyone earns is for his own account. No burdened soul will bear the burden of another. To your Lord is your ultimate return and then He will tell you of everything you disputed. (6:164)

The Lord of the Universe did not reveal His Scriptures in vain. The revelations are His signs, His good news, and His guide to mankind. The Scripture is non-negotiable and cannot be manipulated.

These are the signs of the Reading, a profound Scripture, a guide and good news for those who believe. They uphold the commitments and keep them pure. And they are certain about the Hereafter. (27:2-3)

Those who recite God’s Scripture and uphold the commitments and give to charity from our provisions, publicly or secretly, they seek a transaction that never loses. (35:29)

Charity, donations, amicable treatment of people, equitable trade, moral discipline and the fulfilment of promises are just some of the guidelines encompassed in God’s way. It is, ultimately, the perfect recipe for mankind. However, we have not embraced these prescribed values. The history from the Reading tells us that from the beginning of time, upon receiving God’s Scripture people have insisted on following religion rather than a way of uprightness which promotes good deeds and good works among themselves. They do not promote civility, sincerity, honesty, humbleness, compassion, love or the treatment of each other in the most amicable manner as a way of life. They insist on worship at specific times with the hope that they may be pardoned by their Creator of whatever wrongdoings they have committed. The majority of them prefer to idolise their children, property, imams, priests, religious scholars, prophets and tangible idols. They reject a simple concept of a way of uprightness or deen-al-hunafa. All that is enjoined upon them is to uphold God’s commandments, be sincere in committing themselves to the prescribed deen by doing the good deeds and good works. It is a plain and simple way of life. There is no hardship imposed by God. Of the idol-worshippers the Reading says:

Those who disbelieve among the followers of the previous Scriptures and the idol-worshippers will never believe even after proof comes to them. (98:1)1

All that is enjoined upon them is to believe in God by devoting themselves to serve God’s in sincerity in the way of life (deen), and to uphold the commitments and keep them pure. That is the way of uprightness (deen-al-hunafa). (98:5)

The way of uprightness is measured by personal commitment to the deeds as detailed in His Scripture. We know this from 98:5. One recommended way of upholding the commitment is to observe the following:

Your Lord has decreed that you shall not serve other than Him, and honour your parents for as long as they live, one of them or both of them. You shall not speak harshly to them, nor mistreat them; you shall speak to them amicably, and lower for them the wings of humility and kindness and say, “My Lord, have mercy on them, for they have brought me up from infancy.” (17:23-24)

If we serve God and keep this one simple rule, try to imagine the global impact of such a movement. This is the world that Islam envisions. We are required to consent to what He has prescribed: uphold these commitments and keep them pure. This decree is not a new revelation to the Last Prophet. The same decree was given to Moses for the Children of Israel:

We made a covenant with the Children of Israel, “You shall not serve other than God. You shall regard parents, the relatives, the orphans, and the poor. You shall speak to them amicably. You shall uphold your commitments and keep them pure. But you turned away, except a few of you, and you became averse.” (2:83)

2:83 says the majority of the Children of Israel became averse and aborted their covenant with God. They did not fulfil their obligations.

Similarly, we are expected to uphold our commitments by observing the requirements of the following commandment:

O mankind! You shall observe your Lord, who created you from one person, then created from her, her mate, then from the two of them He spread many men and women. You shall observe God whom you swear by, and regard your relatives. God is watching you. You shall give the orphans their due properties and not substitute the bad for the good, nor shall you consume their money by mixing their properties with yours. This would be a gross injustice. (4:1-2)

Whatever decree had been revealed by God to the children of Israel was again revealed to the Last Prophet, and those who consented themselves are reminded to uphold their commitments and to keep them pure. He repeats many times throughout the Reading that those who believe in Him should serve Him and observe His will through fulfilling their commitments, and that they should keep these commitments pure. God’s covenants are those matters He prescribes in the Scripture. He constantly reminds us about His servants’ obligation to fulfill the covenants:

You shall not touch the orphan’s money, except for their own good until they grow up. You shall fulfil your covenants. You are responsible for your covenants. You shall give full measure when you trade, and weigh with an equitable balance. This is better and more righteous. Surely your hearing, eyesight and your heart will be questioned about them. (17:34-36)

In other words, everything that we do in our life like caring the orphans or even our trading activities will be taken into account. In the hereafter we simply cannot deny what we have done to ourselves in this world because our ears, eyes and heart will testify against us. For example, if we accept anything blindly without using common sense our hearings, eyes and hearts will testify against us.

A Muslim’s claim of consenting to God can therefore be put to the litmus test by observing his commitment to his covenants. Islam is, by the Creator’s design, a way of life characterised by deeds and merit. And by a person’s deeds shall you know them.

The religionists (who insist that their followers recite God’s Scripture in Arabic) would have people parrot the verses of the Reading without ever fulfilling their commitments or gaining any merit. Praying ritually is not part of the deen revealed by God. His prescribed way demands service by deeds. Anyone can perform ritual prayers.

The champions of the Arab religion insist a good Muslim must pray ritually2 five times a day facing Mecca. This is the most important commitment and the first pillar of their religion. There is no basis for this assertion since the Reading does not state a need to fulfil commitments by ritual prayer. Indeed this is a fact and there is no getting away from it.

Thus, they have corrupted one of the most important words in the Reading (and subsequently one of the most important concepts in the deen) by twisting the word Sol-laa (which means commitments) to mean ritual prayer. And they prevent people from upholding their commitments according to the covenants prescribed by God in the Scripture.

Before exploring the misrepresentation of the word Sol-laa, we would do well to explore the Reading and its instruction regarding worship. This is important because the word Sol-laa was mischievously distorted to become ritual prayer. Ritual prayer as we know is an act of worship3.


1 The people of the previous scriptures who follow a religion under a brand name and those who receive the Qur’an but follow a religion are termed as idol worshipers. There is only one way in life for mankind to observe i.e. God’s way

2 This is the most important pillar of faith in the Arab religion. A person’s character is judged by his compliance in performing the ritual prayers including the criminals. In some countries, it is a serious crime for not praying.

3 The word ‘abdi in the Qur’an means servant, na’budu we are serving, laa-ta’budu means ‘do not serve’. Ninety percent of the translations use the word worship instead of ‘serve’.