Zakaa is not about money

Money cannot be connected to the word zakaa in the Reading. It is the obligatory duty of everyone to practice charity. God does not call this zakaa. For charity or donation, God uses different words such as anfak and the attendant derivatives of the word.

So what is the big deal? What does it matter which word you use? The point is that the religionists have created a brand new religious obligation for the people without any basis, the only benefit of which is that it fills up the religious pundits’ coffers.

The idea that the duty of charity and donation (anfak) is a free-will issue has been circumvented by the u’lema. What better way to ensure their own parasitic existence than making financial support for them mandatory and a prerequisite for the attainment of Paradise?

The result is that the u’lema gets their cut from the 2.5% religious tithe they support as a key pillar of salvation and Muslims are completely alien to the concept of charity and donation.

Charity is prescribed

The giving of part of the provisions granted by God is one of the commitments enjoined upon mankind. This instance of self-sacrifice is required of His servants for the benefit of all. Giving without compulsion or need for recognition within or without the boundaries of the deen should be encouraged at every level. Instead of sacrificing a portion of their income or their crop or livestock bestowed upon them by God, they instead sacrifice their eternal soul and succumb to greed by hoarding God’s provisions. Again, the Reading warns us such behaviour is not acceptable. What has happened is that an orderly way of life that promotes the well being of all has been subverted to provide for the few in what has become a rapacious oligarchy.

There are many verses in the Reading calling people to perform acts of charity and God expects us to commit ourselves to these values.

God is the one who created you. He is the one who provides for you. He is the one who causes you to die and He is the one who resurrects you. Can any of your idols do all these? (30:40)

O you who believe, you shall give to charity from God’s provisions to you before a day comes wherein there will be no more business, no favouritism and no intercession. It is the non-believers who chose wickedness. (2:254)

And race towards forgiveness from your Lord, and the paradise that encompasses the heavens and the earth awaits the righteous people who are charitable during the time of prosperity and the times of hardship. They control their anger, and they pardon people. God loves those who are charitable. (3:133-134)

What is wrong with believing in God and the Day of Judgement and giving to charity from God’s provisions? God is fully aware of everyone. (4:39)

You can never guide anyone. God is the only one who guides in accordance with His will. Any charity you give is for your own good. Any charity you give shall be purely for the sake of God. And any charity you give will be repaid to you without the least injustice. (2:272)

These are the prescribed ways of God. We are expected to commit ourselves to this ideal. This is a personal commitment between a person and his or her Creator. Nobody should police the fulfilling of another’s obligations. God has even detailed the deserving recipients of charity. All the guesswork has been taken out. He in His wisdom makes it easy for His servants to fulfil their charitable obligations:

They ask you about charity. Say, “The charity shall go to parents, relatives, the orphans, the poor, and those who are on the path. Any righteous deeds you do, God is fully aware thereof.” (2:215)

He who is charitable in the cause of God is like a seed that grows seven ears with one hundred seeds in each ear. God multiplies the reward many fold for whomever He wills. God is bounteous, omniscient. (2:262)

These are only some of the sixty-odd verses in the Reading on the topic of charity. However, the word used for charity is anfak and not zakat.

This word anfak1 is alien to all the innocent ‘Muslims’ around the world. Very few of them have heard of this word in their life. The religionists concealed this important word in the Reading and the u’lema or the Arab priests assist in the deceit. They have substituted true charity with their corruption of the concept of zakat. The word zakaa actually means to purify. Try substituting that meaning in the many verses where zakaa appears to see how it reads contextually.


1 The word Anfak can generate other words like yun-fik, anfiq, infak and munfik to refer as to spend, the act of spending, spending or in the case of munfik is one who spends

Basic universal values

No court in the world accepts a plea of ignorance as vindication: ignorance of the law is no excuse. By the same token, we cannot plead ignorance on the Day of Judgement or blame someone else for the wrong things that we have done. Nothing could be clearer than the statement in the Reading when it says:

Ain-taqulu yaumal qiamati ain-na-kun-na ‘an-haza ghor-filin. (7:172)

So that you will not say on the Day of Judgement, “Indeed we did not know about this.” (7:172)

Muslims on the whole – and the modern Arabs in particular – are grossly ignorant of God’s message in the Reading. They read without comprehension, believing that they gain merit for just chanting the Arabic verses aloud. They leave the understanding to the u’lema. On the whole, they are sincere and simple people who feel that they need to serve their Lord and lead a righteous life. They have been born into a suffocating inheritance of religion. While it is easy to empathise with this situation, we all have to take responsibility for what we do. We cannot blame our parents for our lot on Judgement Day.

Or you may say, “It was our parents who set up idols, and as descendants we followed their footsteps. Will You punish us because they strayed?” (7:173)

Today, people depend on the u’lema for guidance, but more often than not, the u’lema misguides them. By their deeds, and words we know that these u’lema are agents of the same wicked religionists who invented the Arab religion. We have seen how these fanatics twisted the meaning of the words deen, ‘abd, and Sol-laa. They also twisted the word zakaa (so often mentioned with the word Sol-laa).

Understanding that the u’lema have more than a passing knowledge of the Arabic language, they are doubly guilty of abetting the non-believers and hypocrites to distort the effect of the Qur’anic message on the hearers. They have deviated from the true teachings of the Reading and continue to educate their followers not to understand the meanings of the message of the Book. If that were not enough, they impress upon their followers that salvation is contingent upon those who do not use their common sense or to question the religionists. It is strange that the u’lema rarely encourage their followers to perform charitable deeds according to God’s way in the Reading. This should be the cornerstone of God’s deen. They are, though, most diligent in the matter of collecting ‘zakat’1 which they deem to be a lawful religious tithe. Contributors, on the other hand must not question what they do with this money. According to the Arab culture, it is a cardinal sin to question the u’lema.

Anyone with even elementary Arabic must admit that there is no firm reason why zakaa should signify paying out money. In truth, there is not a single reference in the Reading regarding any such financial contribution or contributions in kind. On the contrary, the Reading advocates non-prejudiced charity and donation as the act of self-sacrifice by men and women towards their fellows in society.


1 In many countries these collections are made through compulsory deduction of salaries from workers – every month. The Vatican survives with such a system and many so-called Muslim countries are doing the same.

Sol-laa is about doing deeds

Everything that a person does should be for God. We are not asked to perform any rituals or to pray to Him or to worship Him. All that is enjoined upon us is to believe in God, be sincere in serving Him by upholding our commitments and do good works. Ritual prayers and worship are the pagans’ shortcut to give idol-worshippers a sense of satisfaction that they have discharged their obligations to God when what is really required of them is that they discharge their Sol-laa amongst fellow humans and themselves.

According to the Reading, the main essence of the message revealed to Abraham and Moses is:

No burdened soul will bear the burden of another1, and every person is responsible for what he or she does. For whatever things that they do, it will be witnessed, and they will be fully repaid. (53:36-41)

In other words, each minute thought and deed is taken into account and recorded. God is recording all the deeds (and not the regimented mutterings) of His servants.

Since We created the human being, We are fully aware of his innermost thoughts. We are closer to him than his jugular vain. The two energies at right and left are recording all his deeds. Not a single utterance does he utter without a vigilant watcher. (50:16-18)

The majority of people do not believe God is omnipresent and that He can be with every human all the time, twenty-four hours a day. However, He knows every single thing a person does, even his innermost thoughts. No one person can hide anything from the Supreme Being. Everything is recorded. In the Hereafter, they are told to read their own record of what they have done to themselves.

You will see every congregation humbled. Every congregation will be invited to view its own record. Today you will be paid for your deeds. This is the record pronouncing the truth about you. Indeed, We have recorded all your deeds. (45:28-29)

Ritual prayer, unfortunately for those who put their faith in it, is not in the category of good deeds. What it is, is a form of religious worship, which goes against the essence of God’s revelations.

It is absurd to imagine a world where regimented prayers have moral precedence over good deeds. Besides, one can look around the world and see many places where people regularly perform ritual prayers and where serious crimes abound: rape, sexual abuse, cheating, stealing and corruption. These people ignore the priorities:

You shall uphold what was prescribed, and also those who repented with you, and not transgress. Indeed, He knows whatever your deeds are, watching. Do not be inclined to those who are wicked – they will make you suffer the Fire, and there is none for you except God as a protector. Then you will not be helped. And uphold your commitments (aqimi-Sol-laa-ta) through the ends of the day and the parts from the night. Indeed the good deeds nullify the bad. That is the remembrance for those who want to remember. You shall be steadfast. God never fails to reward the righteous. (11:112-114)

The verse clearly says we are to uphold what has been prescribed, and not transgress. God is recording all deeds. People must fulfil their commitment to do righteous deeds through the ends of the day and parts of the night. The concept is simple. Good deeds will nullify the bad and this is one way to remember God. Deeds can never be fulfilled through a fixed number of ritual prayers. If the concept of deen is correctly understood, it is clear to the devout Muslim that it is incumbent upon him to commit to these instructions, uphold and observe them. A simple definition of righteous deeds is clearly prescribed in the Reading and it does not include the act of worship or the performance of religious rituals.

Righteousness is not the turning of your faces towards the east or the west. But righteousness is to believe in God, the Hereafter, the energies, the Scripture and the prophets. And to donate of one’s wealth despite one’s love thereof to relatives, the orphans, the needy, those who are in hardship, to beggars, and to free mental enslavement by upholding the commitments and keeping them pure. And to keep the promises that are made, and to remain steadfast in the face of adversity, hardship, and war. These are truthful, these are righteous. (2:177)

The problem arises when a person’s mind is pre-conditioned to believe that Sol-laa means ritual prayer. Thus, righteous deeds are totally ignored. One so conditioned often insists that Sol-laa does mean ritual prayer, although a contextual study of the subject demonstrates that such a position does not make any sense.

Surah 107 is a very short chapter with only seven verses the name of which is Charity. A person who commits himself to the prescribed deen should not neglect his commitment to do charity and good deeds as a way of life.

Do you not notice those who are lying with the deen? They neglect the orphans. They do not advocate the feeding of the poor. Therefore curses be on those who are obliged, while heedless of their commitments. They only show off, and they are averse to charity. (107:1-7)

The religionists and the u’lema believe that God is cursing2 the people who pray ritually. They then teach their values to others who will listen without question – just as they did. Compare this rendition with that sanctioned by the religionists’ twisting culture:

Do you know who the rejecters of faith are? They neglect the orphans. They do not advocate the feeding of the poor. Therefore a curse be on those who pray ritually, while heedless of their ritual prayers. They only show off. And they are averse to charity. (107:1-7)

All seven verses are interrelated: taking care of the orphans, feeding the poor and carrying out charity work can only be fulfilled by the deeds of a committed person. The religionists say God is cursing those who pray whilst heedless of their prayer. They encourage their followers to pray ritually in order to solve the problem of the orphans, the poor and in lieu of charitable work. Instead of committing themselves individually and collectively to taking care of orphans, the poor and to doing charity from their own earnings, the Arabs trained their priests in the Arab religion to become income generators. They take illegal collections from the people by corrupting the word zakaa in the Reading to mean religious tithes.3 The Reading spells out other examples of good deeds to be observed by those who are committed to the prescribed way of life from God:

Successful indeed are the believers, who are upright in their commitments (Sol-laa-ti-hem) those who avoid vain talk, those who keep it pure, they guard their chastity except with their wives, and with those who rightfully belong to them do they have sex without being blamed. (23:1-6)

They are trustworthy when it comes to deposits entrusted to them, or the promises they make, and they constantly uphold their obligations (Solawa-ti-hem) (23:8-9)

In this verse it clearly says that those who avoid vain talk, guard their chastity and commit themselves to these values as a way of life are the successful believers. Additionally, they uphold their obligations diligently in fulfilling what they have promised and they are trustworthy when it comes to deposits entrusted to them. In other words, the Reading emphasises sincerity and honesty through deeds – not through ritual prayer. Unfortunately, we seldom see these good values in the Arab religion. Be that as it may, each time the word Sol-laa or the derivatives from this root word appears in the Reading, it appears in the context of good deeds that people are encouraged to uphold.

A further example:

They fulfil their promises to God and they do not violate their covenant. They linked (ya-Siluu) with it what had been commanded so that it binds (ai-yu-Sol-laa) as they are concerned about their Lord and they fear the dreadful reckoning and they steadfastly persevere in seeking their Lord’s grace. They uphold the commitments (Sol-laa-ta) and they give to charity from Our provisions to them secretly and publicly. They counter evil with good. They have deserved the ultimate abode. (13:21-22)

Here the two letter root Sod Lam signifies the fundamental meaning of ‘link’ for the word ya-Siluu whereas ai-yu-Sol-laa denotes the ‘binding’ and Sol-laa-ta is the proactive ‘commitment’. A person upholds his covenant with God by committing himself in doing the deeds that binds him. The meaning of ‘aqor-mus-Sol-laa-ta’ in this context is to ‘uphold the commitment’ for the covenant. It is ridiculous to assume that we uphold our covenant with God just through ritual prayers everyday.

In 23:1-9 quoted earlier the religionists has deliberately corrupted the meaning of the words ‘Sol-laa-ti’ and ‘Solawa-ti’ in these verses to mean ‘ritual prayer’. They trained their blind followers to ignore the context of the subject completely. Instead, they encourage their followers to concentrate on ritual prayers.


1 This is the fundamental concept of God’s orderly way of life sanctioned to all prophets. Unfortunately Rabbis, pope, priests, monks and mullahs say they can cleanse people’s soul. Only God can cleanse people including the freaks in religious garbs. In 33:15 it says, “No soul will bear the burden of another, when a burdened soul implores for help, nothing can be unloaded, not even by a close relative. So, what are these religious morons doing in our life?

2 This is the most ridiculous way of thinking – obviously not to the priests of the Arab religion.

3 See chapter six.

Serve God through commitments

Again, this is a frightening simple concept. We are encouraged to remind ourselves from the teachings of the Reading:

My commitments, my sacrifices, my life and my death are for God, Lord of the Universe. He has no partner. These are the commandments given to me and I am among the first of those at peace. (6:162-163)

We commit ourselves to everything with sincerity in our personal life including to our job, parents, spouse, children, and associates to enjoy the love, peace and harmony within ourselves for our own good and also for God. It needs self-sacrifice. The Reading teaches a way of life that espouses self-sacrifice for the benefit of all those around us. People are repulsive in committing themselves to the fundamental values prescribed by God in His deen. They are not willing to sacrifice ego, greed and arrogance by observing their obligations to do good deeds.

The Reading teaches these good values, but religionists insist the opposite. When we are confronted with those who dispute this simple concept, we are encouraged to tell them:

Shall I seek other than God as a Lord when He is the Lord of everything in existence? Whatever anyone earns is for his own account. No burdened soul will bear the burden of another. To your Lord is your ultimate return and then He will tell you of everything you disputed. (6:164)

The Lord of the Universe did not reveal His Scriptures in vain. The revelations are His signs, His good news, and His guide to mankind. The Scripture is non-negotiable and cannot be manipulated.

These are the signs of the Reading, a profound Scripture, a guide and good news for those who believe. They uphold the commitments and keep them pure. And they are certain about the Hereafter. (27:2-3)

Those who recite God’s Scripture and uphold the commitments and give to charity from our provisions, publicly or secretly, they seek a transaction that never loses. (35:29)

Charity, donations, amicable treatment of people, equitable trade, moral discipline and the fulfilment of promises are just some of the guidelines encompassed in God’s way. It is, ultimately, the perfect recipe for mankind. However, we have not embraced these prescribed values. The history from the Reading tells us that from the beginning of time, upon receiving God’s Scripture people have insisted on following religion rather than a way of uprightness which promotes good deeds and good works among themselves. They do not promote civility, sincerity, honesty, humbleness, compassion, love or the treatment of each other in the most amicable manner as a way of life. They insist on worship at specific times with the hope that they may be pardoned by their Creator of whatever wrongdoings they have committed. The majority of them prefer to idolise their children, property, imams, priests, religious scholars, prophets and tangible idols. They reject a simple concept of a way of uprightness or deen-al-hunafa. All that is enjoined upon them is to uphold God’s commandments, be sincere in committing themselves to the prescribed deen by doing the good deeds and good works. It is a plain and simple way of life. There is no hardship imposed by God. Of the idol-worshippers the Reading says:

Those who disbelieve among the followers of the previous Scriptures and the idol-worshippers will never believe even after proof comes to them. (98:1)1

All that is enjoined upon them is to believe in God by devoting themselves to serve God’s in sincerity in the way of life (deen), and to uphold the commitments and keep them pure. That is the way of uprightness (deen-al-hunafa). (98:5)

The way of uprightness is measured by personal commitment to the deeds as detailed in His Scripture. We know this from 98:5. One recommended way of upholding the commitment is to observe the following:

Your Lord has decreed that you shall not serve other than Him, and honour your parents for as long as they live, one of them or both of them. You shall not speak harshly to them, nor mistreat them; you shall speak to them amicably, and lower for them the wings of humility and kindness and say, “My Lord, have mercy on them, for they have brought me up from infancy.” (17:23-24)

If we serve God and keep this one simple rule, try to imagine the global impact of such a movement. This is the world that Islam envisions. We are required to consent to what He has prescribed: uphold these commitments and keep them pure. This decree is not a new revelation to the Last Prophet. The same decree was given to Moses for the Children of Israel:

We made a covenant with the Children of Israel, “You shall not serve other than God. You shall regard parents, the relatives, the orphans, and the poor. You shall speak to them amicably. You shall uphold your commitments and keep them pure. But you turned away, except a few of you, and you became averse.” (2:83)

2:83 says the majority of the Children of Israel became averse and aborted their covenant with God. They did not fulfil their obligations.

Similarly, we are expected to uphold our commitments by observing the requirements of the following commandment:

O mankind! You shall observe your Lord, who created you from one person, then created from her, her mate, then from the two of them He spread many men and women. You shall observe God whom you swear by, and regard your relatives. God is watching you. You shall give the orphans their due properties and not substitute the bad for the good, nor shall you consume their money by mixing their properties with yours. This would be a gross injustice. (4:1-2)

Whatever decree had been revealed by God to the children of Israel was again revealed to the Last Prophet, and those who consented themselves are reminded to uphold their commitments and to keep them pure. He repeats many times throughout the Reading that those who believe in Him should serve Him and observe His will through fulfilling their commitments, and that they should keep these commitments pure. God’s covenants are those matters He prescribes in the Scripture. He constantly reminds us about His servants’ obligation to fulfill the covenants:

You shall not touch the orphan’s money, except for their own good until they grow up. You shall fulfil your covenants. You are responsible for your covenants. You shall give full measure when you trade, and weigh with an equitable balance. This is better and more righteous. Surely your hearing, eyesight and your heart will be questioned about them. (17:34-36)

In other words, everything that we do in our life like caring the orphans or even our trading activities will be taken into account. In the hereafter we simply cannot deny what we have done to ourselves in this world because our ears, eyes and heart will testify against us. For example, if we accept anything blindly without using common sense our hearings, eyes and hearts will testify against us.

A Muslim’s claim of consenting to God can therefore be put to the litmus test by observing his commitment to his covenants. Islam is, by the Creator’s design, a way of life characterised by deeds and merit. And by a person’s deeds shall you know them.

The religionists (who insist that their followers recite God’s Scripture in Arabic) would have people parrot the verses of the Reading without ever fulfilling their commitments or gaining any merit. Praying ritually is not part of the deen revealed by God. His prescribed way demands service by deeds. Anyone can perform ritual prayers.

The champions of the Arab religion insist a good Muslim must pray ritually2 five times a day facing Mecca. This is the most important commitment and the first pillar of their religion. There is no basis for this assertion since the Reading does not state a need to fulfil commitments by ritual prayer. Indeed this is a fact and there is no getting away from it.

Thus, they have corrupted one of the most important words in the Reading (and subsequently one of the most important concepts in the deen) by twisting the word Sol-laa (which means commitments) to mean ritual prayer. And they prevent people from upholding their commitments according to the covenants prescribed by God in the Scripture.

Before exploring the misrepresentation of the word Sol-laa, we would do well to explore the Reading and its instruction regarding worship. This is important because the word Sol-laa was mischievously distorted to become ritual prayer. Ritual prayer as we know is an act of worship3.


1 The people of the previous scriptures who follow a religion under a brand name and those who receive the Qur’an but follow a religion are termed as idol worshipers. There is only one way in life for mankind to observe i.e. God’s way

2 This is the most important pillar of faith in the Arab religion. A person’s character is judged by his compliance in performing the ritual prayers including the criminals. In some countries, it is a serious crime for not praying.

3 The word ‘abdi in the Qur’an means servant, na’budu we are serving, laa-ta’budu means ‘do not serve’. Ninety percent of the translations use the word worship instead of ‘serve’.